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Pink Toe Tarantula care questions!!

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
Re humidity - Arachnoclown is I hear is a very experienced keeper, so is more likely to be right. BUT, I
can't help but feel that 'NO HUMIDITY' is misleading/bad advice? Surely they need some humidity in order to moult successfully?

'I did buy a fogged for humidity' - I agree that that definitely shouldn't be used. As I understand it the water bowl is the most important thing. I know in the past there has been bad advice to keep avics too humid, then that combined with lack of ventilation have caused them to die. So I think that is way Arachnoclown is strongly advising against humidity? However I have since read that it wasn't the humidity as such that was killing them - they are used to rainforests right? It was the lack of air flow combined with excess humidity. I have heard that 'air humidity' is quite important but by no means should it be 'wet' with condensation. I am so confused too, because the spider shop below, usually seem to be accurate with advice when I cross-reference, and they are recommending a significantly higher humidity for avics compared to the average recommendation for Ts. Are they wrong?

View attachment 52375

I have only been keeping Ts for 6 months Raptorsnap07, so I am going to link you to some youtube videos that seem to give the soundest advice and explanations overall and have a lot of experience behind them, as well as acknowledging that understanding is changing and improving all the time >



Although, Tom Moran does advise completely against using a hygrometer. I do use a hygrometer, to check the humidity doesn't get too high, if nothing else.
Hi there
Few points for you in relation of your post to think abouts.
1.Humidity and moulting.
Humidity values are irrelevant in regards of moulting.Moulting is internal process solely dependent on the fluids inside tarantulas body not its environment. That's why often they can be observed drinking just before they moult.
2. Species information from vendors.
Many vendors are stating environmental guideline numbers in relation of where tarantulas originate.These numbers are not set in stone and they only reflect a very short period of time when readings are taken.They are more of an additional information rather than a care sheet.Do not mistake one for the other.
Micromanagement of small enclosure conditions located in a room while trying to mimic those of their natural habitat is more likely to go wrong rather than being a success.
3.When using hygrometer have in mind that the cheap gadget you have is probably totally inaccurate as most hobby grade gadgets are.
Regards Konstantin
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
If you don’t mind me asking. What state do you live in? Or country.
Hi
Im sure he will reply to you at some point but it doesn't really matter.
Many people all over the world keep them bone dry with waterdish and have great results and thriving spiders.I keep mine dry since they were little 1.5cm slings with provided waterdish(I see them drinking regularly)and they are all good .
Also while tarantulas are cood blooded and can't regulate body temperature.They are also easily dehydrated if they are not provided heat in a safe for tarantula way.Their body operates in a way that if they loose too much moisture they wont be able to even move,(Think hydraulics)....
Regards Konstantin
 

Raptorsnap07

New Member
Hi
Im sure he will reply to you at some point but it doesn't really matter.
Many people all over the world keep them bone dry with waterdish and have great results and thriving spiders.I keep mine dry since they were little 1.5cm slings with provided waterdish(I see them drinking regularly)and they are all good .
Also while tarantulas are cood blooded and can't regulate body temperature.They are also easily dehydrated if they are not provided heat in a safe for tarantula way.Their body operates in a way that if they loose too much moisture they wont be able to even move,(Think hydraulics)....
Regards Konstantin
So what your saying is to keep them dry but not too dry? Like provide amble sources of water but don’t attempt to make the air more humid and don’t attempt to make the soil more humid
 

WolfSpider

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
So what your saying is to keep them dry but not too dry? Like provide amble sources of water but don’t attempt to make the air more humid and don’t attempt to make the soil more humid
Exactly. Arachnoclown is a tarantula master. If TF was Moses, you would find his recommendations in the burning bush. I have been doing this hobby for 7 years, but when Clownie gives me advice, I say "Thank you, sir!"
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
Hi
What im saying is as far as Avics are concerned
If they have access to clean water dish you dont need to worry about air humidity or moisture in the substrate.Low air humidity in your room only means you will refill the dish more often at it will evaporate quicker.
It is as simple as that.
Regards Konstantin
 

Raptorsnap07

New Member
Hi
What im saying is as far as Avics are concerned
If they have access to clean water dish you dont need to worry about air humidity or moisture in the substrate.Low air humidity in your room only means you will refill the dish more often at it will evaporate quicker.
It is as simple as that.
Regards Konstantin
Thank you everyone for the advice it means a lot sorry if it seemed like I was coming across as a little stubborn and misinformed because I was a little misinformed and I just want to give this T the best life it can have. I am super passionate about this stuff so I am never afraid to ask questions and question when people say things. Thank all of you and I will soon post pictures of my T when I get it! Thank you, happy new year and have a great day!
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
Thank you everyone for the advice it means a lot sorry if it seemed like I was coming across as a little stubborn and misinformed because I was a little misinformed and I just want to give this T the best life it can have. I am super passionate about this stuff so I am never afraid to ask questions and question when people say things. Thank all of you and I will soon post pictures of my T when I get it! Thank you, happy new year and have a great day!
No worries.
There is no stupid question as far as Im concerned.You found a great place to get advice so ask away whatever you need.
Regards Konstantin
 

Gizalba

Well-Known Member
Hi there
Few points for you in relation of your post to think abouts.
1.Humidity and moulting.
Humidity values are irrelevant in regards of moulting.Moulting is internal process solely dependent on the fluids inside tarantulas body not its environment. That's why often they can be observed drinking just before they moult.
2. Species information from vendors.
Many vendors are stating environmental guideline numbers in relation of where tarantulas originate.These numbers are not set in stone and they only reflect a very short period of time when readings are taken.They are more of an additional information rather than a care sheet.Do not mistake one for the other.
Micromanagement of small enclosure conditions located in a room while trying to mimic those of their natural habitat is more likely to go wrong rather than being a success.
3.When using hygrometer have in mind that the cheap gadget you have is probably totally inaccurate as most hobby grade gadgets are.
Regards Konstantin

Thanks very much for that info!

I have often wondered if the hygrometer is accurate, so then I have several hygrometers in one enclosure comparing them ahaha. They do all seem to match up so far, after a while of being in there. So I feel like they can't all be wrong even though they all move to say the same reading when they change enclosures? Or maybe they can, they do look cheap. But yeah I will just try to use them as a vague guide from now on.
 

Arachnoclown

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Avicularia actually don't use substrate at all. You can actually set up their enclosure without any. I once used a cork tile on the floor of a exoterra with no substrate at all...just a bowl of water. In the 80s I used fish gravel or sand...not just for pinktoes but all tarantulas. Never had a problem ever either.
 

Raptorsnap07

New Member
Avicularia actually don't use substrate at all. You can actually set up their enclosure without any. I once used a cork tile on the floor of a exoterra with no substrate at all...just a bowl of water. In the 80s I used fish gravel or sand...not just for pinktoes but all tarantulas. Never had a problem ever either.
I will probably do substrate anyways though just because it makes the cage look more natural
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Tarantula Club Member
If you don’t mind me asking. What state do you live in? Or country.


If you go to the left of the post & either place your cursor over, (or sometimes you may need to left click,) on Arachnoclown's name, or anyone elses login name. It will underline & you will see a pop up window. Most of us have declared our country or state & that will be in the pop up window, if that poster has made that detail known.

Arachnoclown is from Portland.
 

Gizalba

Well-Known Member
Just a bit of a dig about following Stan's out dated advice in his books;).. Understanding of Ts and care of them has moved on and his books seem very outdated now and still waiting for the 4th edition which is taking forever to appear with new and relevant information - in the meantime he will keep plugging the old book :)

Eek, that book is the one I have used as a foundation guide as it's the only detailed book with references I could find written by an experienced keeper. I did keep in mind it was written ages ago but I wondered which bits in particular are outdated? Him plugging the old book instead of bringing out an updated one is indeed bad :/
 

octanejunkie

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Welcome!

I have many pink toes, and other avicularia sp, and many non-avic species Ts thriving in CA where it's dry af. I heat my T area and mist/water regularly. Deep substrate holds moisture and cross ventilation is key for airflow. DO YOUR RESEARCH!

Seems like you've gotten enough advice already so I'll just say Hi :T:
 

Hops

New Member
Re humidity - Arachnoclown is I hear is a very experienced keeper, so is more likely to be right. BUT, I
can't help but feel that 'NO HUMIDITY' is misleading/bad advice? Surely they need some humidity in order to moult successfully?

'I did buy a fogged for humidity' - I agree that that definitely shouldn't be used. As I understand it the water bowl is the most important thing. I know in the past there has been bad advice to keep avics too humid, then that combined with lack of ventilation have caused them to die. So I think that is way Arachnoclown is strongly advising against humidity? However I have since read that it wasn't the humidity as such that was killing them - they are used to rainforests right? It was the lack of air flow combined with excess humidity. I have heard that 'air humidity' is quite important but by no means should it be 'wet' with condensation. I am so confused too, because the spider shop below, usually seem to be accurate with advice when I cross-reference, and they are recommending a significantly higher humidity for avics compared to the average recommendation for Ts. Are they wrong?

View attachment 52375

I have only been keeping Ts for 6 months Raptorsnap07, so I am going to link you to some youtube videos that seem to give the soundest advice and explanations overall and have a lot of experience behind them, as well as acknowledging that understanding is changing and improving all the time >



Although, Tom Moran does advise completely against using a hygrometer. I do use a hygrometer, to check the humidity doesn't get too high, if nothing else.
thanks for your information.
 

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