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Looking Into My First Tarantula

mrsoul1974

Well-Known Member
I was a little nervous about caring for a sling, but all those fears were laid to rest after the first couple of successful molts. It's actually a great learning experience learning about the molt and pre-molt stages. Fun to watch them grow! After a while, you look forward to the whole process and not stress out because of it.
 

Whitelightning777

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Premium Member
Hi there. Congratulations on getting ready to get your first.

I was originally thinking of getting an A. chalcodes as my first, but what put me off is that they are such ridiculously slow growers, that if you want an adult, chances are it's WC. I worry that mass importation of wild caught T's could cause wild populations to plummet. I've seen too many Youtube videos and forum posts of WC B. albopilosums laying egg sacks in their enclosures, much to the shock of their new owners (wouldn't be surprised if the same is happening with A. chalcodes). Obviously, taking gravid females from the wild must have a negative impact on local populations, but it seems to be happening.

So if your heart is set on an adult female A. Chalcodes, try to get a captive bred specimen. A reputable seller will be able to give that info. I agree that they are lovely T's.

Personally, I haven't got round to getting my T yet. But when I do it will be from either the Brachypelma or Grammastola genera. Maybe a G. pulchra, G. pulchripes or B. auratam. There's so many to choose from !!!

A chalcodes is from the United States. They aren't endangered. Each year where they live residents can see dozens of mature males each day in the breeding season. If you do get WC, ensure that they got a female from a burrow, not a wandering male.

Of course captive bred is best & there are reputed to have very large numbers of offspring when bred. They are also reported to fast in winter time regardless of temperature.

Full disclosure: I don't own one yet but caresheets are widely available. Basically they are kept just like Rose hairs. They are supposed to be a slow growing but hardy species.
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
A chalcodes is from the United States. They aren't endangered. Each year where they live residents can see dozens of mature males each day in the breeding season. If you do get WC, ensure that they got a female from a burrow, not a wandering male.

Of course captive bred is best & there are reputed to have very large numbers of offspring when bred. They are also reported to fast in winter time regardless of temperature.

Full disclosure: I don't own one yet but caresheets are widely available. Basically they are kept just like Rose hairs. They are supposed to be a slow growing but hardy species.
I'm aware of their country of origin lol
 

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