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Hey! Im having a hard time deciding

Which one?

  • Brachypelma hamorii

    Votes: 5 26.3%
  • Grammostola rosea

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Grammostola pulchripes

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • Grammostola pulchra

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Brachypelma albopisolum

    Votes: 9 47.4%

  • Total voters
    19
  • Poll closed .

JustinWC

New Member
I'm a new tarantula keeper and I need help deciding on which species I should get for a beginner,here are some on my list:
Brachypelma hamorii (red knee)
Grammostola rosea (red rose hair)
Grammostola pulcripes (chaco golden knee)
Grammostola pulchra (brazillian black)
Brachypelma albopisolum (honduran curly)

Im not sure which one to get, one thing that I want to be able to do is to handle it, and I know even the same species of tarantula exactly can have different personalities like let's say my tarantula is very skittish as a grammostola porteri but other people's grammostola porteri is docile, about that i would have to just hope for the best. Thanks!
 

PanzoN88

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
I won't go to deep into the subject, but handling is not recommended regardless of species due to potential accidents that may or may not occur.

As for the species, if you get slings, I'd recommend getting the T. albopilosum (the Nicaraguan locale of the T. albopilosum looks better in my opinion), G. pulchripes, and the B. hamorii, as they are all ridiculously easy to keep.

The reason I didn't recommend the G. pulchra is price, although I'm not sure how much they go for in your area. I didn't recommend a G. porteri or G. rosea because they have habits that may frustrate a new keeper.
 

Enn49

Moderator
Staff member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Premium Member
I'd definitely go for the Tliltocatl albopilosum Honduran (formerly Brachypelma) as right from the tiniest sling they are entertaining. As slings they are constantly digging but as adults they are usually in full view.
 

ilovebrachys

Well-Known Member
I'd go for the Grammostola pulchripes.. Perfect starter Ts.. Always busy sometimes hide away as small slings but as juvies seem to be quite visable, great feeders and become a nice size adult.. Very nice looking too :)
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
I always say the T albopilosum cos they are adorable and bullet proof. But to be fair, I think any of those on your list would be a great 1st t. The question is down to availability because they are not all easy to get hold of at all times. Plus Brachys and Grammy's are slow growers, particularly pulchra and rosea imo.
 

Brachyfan

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I started with a T albopilosum and couldn't be happier. It went from 1/2" sling to about 2.5" in about 5 months and is just an awesome spider.

B hamorii are just beautiful but can be bad with hair kicking, especially around a moult.

Grammastola pulchra are awesome. Great temperment in general. They are expensive though.

Grammastola pulchripes is probably my favorite on the list. They get pretty large and are gorgeous!

The only one I don't have is a porteri/rosea. They are difficult to breed and Chile killed exporting. They can fast for over a year (18 months is the longest I have heard of) and some are just absolutely nuts! Just look up psycho rosie's. But they were a hobby staple and live ridiculously long. Also they are the epitome of the term "pet rock".

My vote would be for T albopilosum for their hardiness and price. I paid 10 bucks for mine :) but if you want a really cool big spider I would go for the Grammastola pulchripes.
 

Hemolymph

Well-Known Member
I’ve owned all these spiders in the past. Due to constantly handling them I now have a severe allergic reaction to the hairs. I now only own old world tarantulas. Just looking at a albopilosum makes my skin crawl, the worst one for hairs of your group mentioned. If I had to choose from your list it would be hard to choose between the pulchra and the hamorii.
Both are awesome lookers vs. the other boring brown spiders. I’d lean more toward the classic hamorii.
 

Brachyfan

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I’ve owned all these spiders in the past. Due to constantly handling them I now have a severe allergic reaction to the hairs. I now only own old world tarantulas. Just looking at a albopilosum makes my skin crawl, the worst one for hairs of your group mentioned. If I had to choose from your list it would be hard to choose between the pulchra and the hamorii.
Both are awesome lookers vs. the other boring brown spiders. I’d lean more toward the classic hamorii.

How long did the allergy take to develop?
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Years, I haven’t been officially diagnosed but the rashes have been getting worse over the years. I don’t even have to hold one to break out now. When I go to @Arachnoclown house to buy Ts I’m itching for days afterwards. I’ve talked with many other keepers in the hobby with similar symptoms. :(
I've heard the same, that exposure builds up over time and symptoms get progressively worse, to the point of unbearable like you've experienced.

I love new worlds so I'm taking precautions now, hoping that I can limit my exposure as much as possible. Just stuff like using tools and wearing gloves for big maintenance jobs and rehousings. I know I'm still getting exposed but if I can avoid getting itchy as much as possible, then I'm hoping it'll help in the long run. Do you think I'm wasting my time, so to speak?
 

Hemolymph

Well-Known Member
I've heard the same, that exposure builds up over time and symptoms get progressively worse, to the point of unbearable like you've experienced.

I love new worlds so I'm taking precautions now, hoping that I can limit my exposure as much as possible. Just stuff like using tools and wearing gloves for big maintenance jobs and rehousings. I know I'm still getting exposed but if I can avoid getting itchy as much as possible, then I'm hoping it'll help in the long run. Do you think I'm wasting my time, so to speak?
I think individuals vary, clown has kept them much longer then me. He always had all the wicked hair kickers too.
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
I think individuals vary, clown has kept them much longer then me. He always had all the wicked hair kickers too.
I had a couple of times where ive probably had my face too close to the sazimai's enclosure then I've had a slight itch in my eye (which I rinsed well). Didn't see it kick but those hairs are floating around anyway. I probably floated some up from breathing, doh!! I've had a similar itch on my wrist, again the sazimai, so I've definitely got some sensitivity, especially to that one. I'm keeping my face a sensible distance now anyway. The eyes and airways are the last place you want those hairs :)
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I'm a new tarantula keeper and I need help deciding on which species I should get for a beginner,here are some on my list:
Brachypelma hamorii (red knee)
Grammostola rosea (red rose hair)
Grammostola pulcripes (chaco golden knee)
Grammostola pulchra (brazillian black)
Brachypelma albopisolum (honduran curly)

My 5p worth, for what it is worth. We have a hamorii. rosea, pulcharpes, pulchra & an albopisolum. And just for your reference, the albopisolum, is now a Tliltocatl not a Brachypelma. It was a recent change & many are still sold as Brachy's.

As a first T, I would go for the hamorii or albopisolum personally. And simply because you stand more chance of buying a larger one of those, than you do with the Gramastolas. As the Gramastola's are slow growers & harder to find at juvinile or larger as a result. But all of the above are great T's & well worth getting,
 

Seamus

Member
I'm a new tarantula keeper and I need help deciding on which species I should get for a beginner,here are some on my list:
Brachypelma hamorii (red knee)
Grammostola rosea (red rose hair)
Grammostola pulcripes (chaco golden knee)
Grammostola pulchra (brazillian black)
Brachypelma albopisolum (honduran curly)

Im not sure which one to get, one thing that I want to be able to do is to handle it, and I know even the same species of tarantula exactly can have different personalities like let's say my tarantula is very skittish as a grammostola porteri but other people's grammostola porteri is docile, about that i would have to just hope for the best. Thanks!
Mexican red knee or curly hair great docile species but would not recommend handling any tarantula as accidents do happen
 

New2T’s

Member
All are great beginner species. I’d say the T. Albopilosum. It was my first T. I absolutely love them. They grow lil quicker than some the others you listed. Neither of mine are hair kickers and are always out. I have a Honduran and a Nicaraguan. Great eaters as well. Let us know which T you choose.
 

Dupid22

New Member
Another possibility for your list could be the avicularia avicularia (pink toe). They are very docile like the G. Rosea. I hold mine all the time and havent had him flick any hairs yet. They one draw back is they are arboreal so the tank set up is a little more needy. Also they require high humidity which can be a tricky thing to maintain being new.

That being said my first was the G Rosea and he was docile and everything but overall just kinda boring.
 

Rs50matt

Well-Known Member
Another possibility for your list could be the avicularia avicularia (pink toe). They are very docile like the G. Rosea. I hold mine all the time and havent had him flick any hairs yet. They one draw back is they are arboreal so the tank set up is a little more needy. Also they require high humidity which can be a tricky thing to maintain being new.

That being said my first was the G Rosea and he was docile and everything but overall just kinda boring.
I'm not going to comment on the handling. But be aware Avics don't kick hair. They transfer them through rubbing so that might be why it hasn't kicked any. High humidity could be fatal to it as it creates a stuffy enclosure and it's not recommended. Lots of cross ventilation and a waterdish is how most people keep them.
 

Dupid22

New Member
I'm not going to comment on the handling. But be aware Avics don't kick hair. They transfer them through rubbing so that might be why it hasn't kicked any. High humidity could be fatal to it as it creates a stuffy enclosure and it's not recommended. Lots of cross ventilation and a waterdish is how most people keep them.
That would make total sense on why he hasn't kicked any. And that is also how I maintain the humidity. Good airflow is critical or they wont web and it's super stressful on them. You have good points maybe this isnt the best starter T. I do prefer the arboreals because they are more fascinating in my opinion, they will climb all over rather than chilling in a burrow.

Needless to say, which ever you decide to get please please please research them. Any T can be a perfect pet, but the biggest mistake new owners make is not providing the T with its optimal habitat (or trying to constantly adjust the environment). T's stress relatively easily which can result in death if you continue to stress them.

Do your research and you will have found a new hobby that you keep for life.
 
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