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Help with Tarantula Humidity

dc23

New Member
Messages
3
Location
London
Hi guys,

Just hoping for a bit of help honestly. I’ve only just got into the hobby but struggling with the humidity for my Mexican Red Knee. She’s only a juvenile but I’ve attached a picture of her enclosure but the humidity won’t drop below 90%.

I live in the UK so it’s not necessarily warm and probably averages 20 degrees in the room, her enclosure sits on my desk (which isn’t used much in terms of the monitor etc). I change the water every other day, but never soak or mist the substrate which hasn’t been watered since I first set the enclosure.

I don’t want to disturb her if possible, but also worry it’s too humid for the species so would rather resolve it. Since the below photo I have drilled a further two lines of holes in the lid but it’s not made any difference.

Hopefully someone can shed some light or help?
Thanks,
Dan

IMG_7537.jpeg
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Messages
975
Location
Preston,UK
Hi
that gadget you are using is notoriously inaccurate.
The species you mentioned is quite hardy and robust.Keep substrate fully dry and packed down( as tarantulas don’t like fluffy substrate ) you can slightly overflow the waterdish once in a while and let it dry completely before repeating and thats all.
Tarantula care doesn't refolve around chasing specific humidity and temperature figures and chasing those does more harm than good usually.
If your substrate is moist just let it dry out naturally no need to change it with dry one.
Also no need to change the water so often. Once a week or two is fine to clean dish out ,just top up as needed if evaporate too quickly between cleanings or it gets soiled
Regards Konstantin
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Messages
975
Location
Preston,UK
Hi
also if enclosure is on a desk make sure it doesn't get any direct sunlight on in as that can cook the spider in it.
I also live in UK and never measured humidity at all
Regards Konstantin
 

dc23

New Member
Messages
3
Location
London
Hi
that gadget you are using is notoriously inaccurate.
The species you mentioned is quite hardy and robust.Keep substrate fully dry and packed down( as tarantulas don’t like fluffy substrate ) you can slightly overflow the waterdish once in a while and let it dry completely before repeating and thats all.
Tarantula care doesn't refolve around chasing specific humidity and temperature figures and chasing those does more harm than good usually.
If your substrate is moist just let it dry out naturally no need to change it with dry one.
Also no need to change the water so often. Once a week or two is fine to clean dish out ,just top up as needed if evaporate too quickly between cleanings or it gets soiled
Regards Konstantin
Hi Konstantin,

Thanks very much for your reply, made me feel much better as was worried I was doing something wrong and the tarantula wouldn’t be happy, I might just take the device out if it’s no real use then!

In terms of its location on the desk, it is away from any direct sunlight as doesn’t get any into the room.

Thanks again!
Dan
 

meridannight

Member
Messages
43
Location
Tropical den
I never check the humidity in the enclosures. I have normal levels in my home, RH in my house being 60-80% and the enclosures gotta be something in that range as well. That's not gonna cause any problems, and chasing for a specific humidity level is nonsense, like others have already mentioned.
 

meridannight

Member
Messages
43
Location
Tropical den
As for the specific question you asked -- unless the enclosure inside is wet and mold/fungus is growing in there 90% shouldn't be an issue either, if that number is correct. But I doubt it, because usual household humidity levels in modern homes are around 30-40%. So, I'm inclined to think that gizmo is wrong. To reach 90% at such household levels you'd need to be constantly misting that enclosure.
 

Blackdog

Active Member
Messages
217
Location
Richmond
That gauge would be far more accurate if it was directly in contact with the substrate. I use them in my tortoise enclosure where I have a lot more space. Pretty unnecessary for your T
 

Blackdog

Active Member
Messages
217
Location
Richmond
sorry for the mistake
That gauge would be far more accurate if it was directly in contact with the substrate. I use them in my tortoise enclosure where I have a lot more space. Pretty unnecessary for your T
Not in contact with the substrate. - sorry for the mistype
 

Heretic

Member
Messages
61
Location
Indianapolis
Humidity is a tricky thing and depending on how the device collects the data and where the device is in relation to a source of water will effect accuracy. I would assume your enclosure is several steps above your home due to the closed environment. Buy 3 anolog gage type units, mount 1 on a "stick" and place it in the middle of the enclosure like a sign post, place another against the side facing out and another outside of the enclosure to measure the room the enclosure is in. You then have a data stream to measure for 1 month. With this data you can predict the humidity inside the enclosure without the "sign post" one and therefore remove it only keeping the two remaining.
 

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