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Superworms

TwinkleToes19

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60
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Florida
After doing some research and listening to the advice of others on this board l, I've decided to get superworms since I have better access to a smaller amount online. I'm planning to switch to them from crickets bc it's just easier care. I already did the research for how to keep them, but I'd like to hear your guys' opinion and advice on them. I'm getting a 50 count, the smallest batch I can find, and I have only one T. I'm hoping the majority won't die on me before I can feed them to my T.
 

DustyD

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Those should last you more than a year if you can keep them alive. I think the key to keeping them is making sure they get moisture from the food they eat, such as from fruit and veggies. Otherwise they will cannibalize each other for moisture. They also get sustenance from the grain substrate you keep them in.

I tend to feed my T’s a mixture of superworms and crickets. Although crickets seem not to last as long for me.
 

TwinkleToes19

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Florida
Those should last you more than a year if you can keep them alive. I think the key to keeping them is making sure they get moisture from the food they eat, such as from fruit and veggies. Otherwise they will cannibalize each other for moisture. They also get sustenance from the grain substrate you keep them in.

I tend to feed my T’s a mixture of superworms and crickets. Although crickets seem not to last as long for me.
Will 50 of them be fine in a 9 x 5 in critter keeper? I do have a second one of the same size I can use if needed.
 

DustyD

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I am not sure, but I would think so.

Hopefully more long term keepers will chime in. Or maybe the seller/website has info. I read that you don’t want the substrate too deep as it can overheat at the bottom.

Providing enough food for moisture as stated is important to their survival.
 

m0lsx

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Moisture is provided via fruit or veg. Something cheap (ish) like potatoes is fine. Change this every other day to avoid mold.
For substrate use something like bran or porridge, but nothing instant. That is use natural, unmolested bran, porridge etc & only use 1 to 2 inches.
Room temperature is fine & as mentioned above deep substrate overheats them & thus kills them. Over active or worms pulling into a C-shape is a sign it's getting too hot for them.
Ventilation is important. Among other things, it stops your substrate from being mouldy.
Dead worms turn black & these obviously need to be removed asap.
Expect 6 months life span from your worms if you are looking after them properly & potentially as much as one year.
 

Hagraven

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United States
Superworms are great! I like using these as an occasional feeder. They're easy to work with, just be careful not to allow them to burrow in your T's enclosure, lest they re-emerge as beetles! I keep mine in a critter keeper with cocofiber. I had been using oats as a substrate for a few months when one day mites decided to take advantage of the grain and set up shop (I can't say if this was a fluke or perhaps they had been attracted to the carrots I left in with my superworms?) Either way, they have lived many months on cocofiber. Also, though I admit I am an over-worrier, I try and offer my feeders organic produce, as I can only imagine foods with pesticides would immediately or overtime end up negatively effecting the health of your feeders, and by extension, your T. Keep in mind, I am still new to all of this, this is just my take. Best of luck!
 

MBullock

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Arizona
I prefer to crush their head so they cant fight back.. they have really strong jaws, like a jerusalem cricket, almost.
I was using some as fishing bait once and i was careless and it bit the crap outta me LOL
Ever since then i've been alot more careful of them, if they can hurt me like that, then they can easily injure a limb or pedicel (the part connecting the abdomen to the head)
 

TwinkleToes19

Member
Messages
60
Location
Florida
Moisture is provided via fruit or veg. Something cheap (ish) like potatoes is fine. Change this every other day to avoid mold.
For substrate use something like bran or porridge, but nothing instant. That is use natural, unmolested bran, porridge etc & only use 1 to 2 inches.
Room temperature is fine & as mentioned above deep substrate overheats them & thus kills them. Over active or worms pulling into a C-shape is a sign it's getting too hot for them.
Ventilation is important. Among other things, it stops your substrate from being mouldy.
Dead worms turn black & these obviously need to be removed asap.
Expect 6 months life span from your worms if you are looking after them properly & potentially as much as one year.
Thank you for the advice, also do you think 50 small superworms would be fine in a 40 square in space? I don't want them to die from being overcrowded. Also how do you keep them from pupating, or do they not do that if kept normally?
 

m0lsx

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Thank you for the advice, also do you think 50 small superworms would be fine in a 40 square in space? I don't want them to die from being overcrowded. Also how do you keep them from pupating, or do they not do that if kept normally?

Personally, I only keep a few super / morio worms, as they are a high fat food, so I only feed them occasionally, thus only keep a few.

My understanding is that superworms do not pupate as easily if they are kept in close contact with other superworms. So keeping them in smaller environments, helps to lengthen their usable lives, as far as we are concerned. And yes I would say 50 superworms would do well in a 9 X 5 enclosure.
 

Dr. Phibes

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Location
North Carolina
I found they burrow immediately upon hitting the substrate, and than you have to dig them out which is a pain. You don't want them turning into a Darkling Beetle (it does take long time for them to pupate), which can chew on or kill your T while they're vulnerable after a molt. They grow fairly large as well in their worm size state. I would say like a couple others to crush their head ( I feel bad doing that myself) but keeps them from living and morphing in the enclosure. 50 is a lot of worms so you will be set for long time. If your T is not large they prob won't accept them when the worms get a beastly size.
 

m0lsx

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I found they burrow immediately upon hitting the substrate, and than you have to dig them out which is a pain. You don't want them turning into a Darkling Beetle (it does take long time for them to pupate), which can chew on or kill your T while they're vulnerable after a molt.

Super/ morio worms, like mealworms, should be beheaded before they are used as food. As this stops them from burrowing & then reemerging as beetles.

Beheaded mealworms / superworms continue to move for at least 24 hours.
 

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