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Sucking stomach

IliaIlyich

New Member
Everyone gets excited to have their spider finally molt and examine it for its sex. Theres one other thing you should be looking for and it's super easy to spot...the sucking stomach.
I recently had a already sexed juvenile Tliltocatl Sabulosum molt so I just tossed her molt in the trash. A few weeks later I noticed she was looking very thin. Upon inspection of her burrow I found dead whole carcasses. I tossed her a roach and watched her. She nailed it and began stuffing it in her mouth. The next day I found her in her water dish and the roach was uneaten. I tried everything to get her to eat...even blended up roaches and superworms into soup. She always tried to eat but it nothing would work. I was constantly retrieving her out of her water dish. She eventually passed away...dehydration/drowning. (Photo of her trying to eat smashed superworms)View attachment 43156
Even if I had seen it before I threw the molt away there was nothing I could have done.
Losing a sucking stomach is basically a death sentence for a tarantula. Chances of them surviving to the next molt is slim to none. There is no cure for it besides another molt. So dont get all stressed out and worried...it does happen but it's not that common.

I thought I would share what you should look for every time you get a molt. No magnification needed...easy to spot everytime. This an example a successful molt of the sucking stomach.
View attachment 43157View attachment 43158View attachment 43159View attachment 43160View attachment 43161
Wow!!! Looking for information about stomach on Russian just yesterday! It’s very interesting! Thank you for your photos and very interesting text!
 

spidysoph

New Member
Everyone gets excited to have their spider finally molt and examine it for its sex. Theres one other thing you should be looking for and it's super easy to spot...the sucking stomach.
I recently had a already sexed juvenile Tliltocatl Sabulosum molt so I just tossed her molt in the trash. A few weeks later I noticed she was looking very thin. Upon inspection of her burrow I found dead whole carcasses. I tossed her a roach and watched her. She nailed it and began stuffing it in her mouth. The next day I found her in her water dish and the roach was uneaten. I tried everything to get her to eat...even blended up roaches and superworms into soup. She always tried to eat but it nothing would work. I was constantly retrieving her out of her water dish. She eventually passed away...dehydration/drowning. (Photo of her trying to eat smashed superworms)View attachment 43156
Even if I had seen it before I threw the molt away there was nothing I could have done.
Losing a sucking stomach is basically a death sentence for a tarantula. Chances of them surviving to the next molt is slim to none. There is no cure for it besides another molt. So dont get all stressed out and worried...it does happen but it's not that common.

I thought I would share what you should look for every time you get a molt. No magnification needed...easy to spot everytime. This an example a successful molt of the sucking stomach.
View attachment 43157View attachment 43158View attachment 43159View attachment 43160View attachment 43161
My tarantula (avicularia avicularia) escaped and just reappeared tonight, she is about 1.5 years old. Although I have only had her back for about an hour, she is sucking in her stomach as described by this thread, super bizarre and something I have never seen her do before. She was gone for about a month. Please let me know if anyone has any insight. Is she going to die?
 

Rs50matt

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
My tarantula (avicularia avicularia) escaped and just reappeared tonight, she is about 1.5 years old. Although I have only had her back for about an hour, she is sucking in her stomach as described by this thread, super bizarre and something I have never seen her do before. She was gone for about a month. Please let me know if anyone has any insight. Is she going to die?
No , you may have misread this thread. The sucking stomach is how Ts eat and drink. This thread is referring to Ts that have an issue during molting. If you can see your T sucking then it’s more than likely drinking.
 

spidysoph

New Member
No , you may have misread this thread. The sucking stomach is how Ts eat and drink. This thread is referring to Ts that have an issue during molting. If you can see your T sucking then it’s more than likely drinking.
Thanks Matt(?)! Your input is very helpful (as you can tell I am still pretty new to this hobby). Last night when I got her back into her enclosure she also had her fangs out and looked like she was quite literally eating one of her legs? Her rump is very small as she probably wasn't very well-nourished, if at all, while she went on her month-long vacation to who knows where in my apartment. Now she isn't moving at all even when I tried lightly shaking her enclosure. I'll leave her be for a while to see if she has moved or is possibly molting. She did have to move a decent amount in order to be found on the couch last night though...

Either way, I appreciate the feedback.
 

jmabbot

New Member
Tarantula Club Member
I'm pretty positive this is what happened to my P. ornata. Once she molted, I could never get her to eat. She ended up passing several months after molting without ever eating one roach. I will have to start checking for this.
 

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