• Are you a Tarantula hobbyist? If so, we invite you to join our community! Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your pets and enclosures and chat with other Tarantula enthusiasts. Sign up today!

55 gallons...

kormath

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Easily. The giant's would all do well. T. stirmi, T. blondi, Nhandu's, Lasiodaras, A. genic, etc. etc.
 

auganator

Member
Well I guess they don't need to be aboreal, a terrestrial that would work with 15 x 15 would work, but seems like a waste of all that height.
 

auganator

Member
Really nice..I dont see where the ventilation is at though..
non yet, but the wooden top wont be there, im going to make a screen top. The screen top along with the live plants, and the fact its a pretty well ventilated room, should create enough air flow.
 

Thistles

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Fill it with dirt and let a Theraphosa burrow. I have a few reservations about that tank, but I'm on my phone now and don't want to fight autocorrect for long enough to post them.
 

Thistles

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Ok, sorry, back on a computer!

First, don't try to split it. One of the spiders will always find its way into the other side, and presto! One fat spider.

Second, ventilation is a bit of a concern. I have a rather large (20 gallon) 24" deep tank for my AF Pelinobius muticus, but I keep her on the dry side so I don't have to worry about too little ventilation causing mold. If you follow Scoolman's lead and set up a viv with cleaner crew and good air circulation (not the same as ventilation) you could keep a big ole Theraphosa in there, and she'd love to burrow in such a deep tank.

Some people have kept Poecilotheria communally, but in addition to the risk of cannibalism I have some concern about the size of the tank and the other members of your household. When dealing with speedy spiders, I like to move the tank to a small room which I can seal off. You can't exactly be picking that beast up and moving it into the bathroom every time you need to do maintenance, and more pokies just multiplies the chance for escapees and mishaps, particularly for a first time keeper. You've gotta be on your toes for a single poec. I can't imagine having to watch 5 of them while having to maintain a tank with the whole lid removed, especially since they're arboreal and their instinct will be to run up!

Here's another thought: don't do a spider. I've kept a communal of Pandinus imperator (I like to call them "pimperators" because it sounds more gangsta... oh god, I'm fooling no one) in a 44 gallon pentagon. They LOVED to dig in it, and I had a few batches of scorplings in there. You could do another type of tolerant scorpion, or do some Amblypygids! They're wicked cool, and would use the vertical space.
 

auganator

Member
what do you all think about a giant salmon? from what I read they still get big enough to justify the cage, are hardy, and they are a bit for mellow then the theraphosa's.
 

Scoolman

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
what do you all think about a giant salmon? from what I read they still get big enough to justify the cage, are hardy, and they are a bit for mellow then the theraphosa's.
L parahybana would be great, but the height is excessive for this species. You would need to fill half of the height with substrate.
 

auganator

Member
L parahybana would be great, but the height is excessive for this species. You would need to fill half of the height with substrate.
would that be such a bad thing now? I know they arent big burrowers, but im sure he would still appreciate some soil. the height would also help prevent any possible escapes.
 

kormath

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
would that be such a bad thing now? I know they arent big burrowers, but im sure he would still appreciate some soil. the height would also help prevent any possible escapes.
The farther they have to fall if they get in a mood to climb, the more likely they won't survive the fall. Rule of thumb on terrestrial T is not let them have climbing room higher than their DLS.
 

auganator

Member
The farther they have to fall if they get in a mood to climb, the more likely they won't survive the fall. Rule of thumb on terrestrial T is not let them have climbing room higher than their DLS.
would a lair of Vaseline halfway up the tank dissuade him from climbing? assuming I end up with the salmon, how does this setup sound. 1 inch of vermiculite topped with 5 inches of eco-earth, a log hide, a shallow water dish, either a vine or fern (or both), and a few branches with epiphytes on them.
oh yeah, and springtails.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top