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Skeleton Leg hasn’t moved since I received her

TranUrMeal86

New Member
I’m hoping my skeleton leg tarantula isn’t dying she hasn’t moved for four days and she’s not eating and she’s sitting still the whole time does anybody have any experience with this and know if this is normal or she might be molting
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
I’m hoping my skeleton leg tarantula isn’t dying she hasn’t moved for four days and she’s not eating and she’s sitting still the whole time does anybody have any experience with this and know if this is normal or she might be molting
Can you post a picture, it will help a lot. Thanks
 

T-Baby

Well-Known Member
Mine had about 8inches of substrate, I created a make shift burrow fo start her off and she utilised it, dug the burrow all the way down to the bottom and silk lined the whole thing including the top layer of the entrance (as a trap for prey) they also like a light misting. I did this once a week.
She could just be uncomfortable, try adjusting her set up to her needs and coax her over to the burrow.
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
She could just be uncomfortable, try adjusting her set up to her needs and coax her over to the burrow.
I have seen this several times with my T's. Move where you keep the enclosure or change the interior of the enclosure & you get a totally different T sometimes.
 

Nunua

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Burrowing species, especially when older, seem to get relatively stressed when they get moved from their old enclosure. Just give her some time in peace and quiet and I'm pretty sure she'll get used to the surroundings.

She's most likely not eating thanks to stress and that's normal. A stressed up tarantulas also tend to sit on one place until they feel comfortable enough to move around - At least she has webbed the ground a bit which helps her to get used to the daily vibrations she feels when people are moving around the house. The web works like an amplifier and helps her to locate the source of vibrations.
 
I agree it takes them time to adjust to a new enclosure, I don't have that species but just got a 4 inch T.albopilosum 2 weeks ago who just found her hide today . My A.seemanni took a couple of weeks also but now is burrowed to the bottom of the enclosure
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I collected a T stirmi yesterday. When I put her into her new enclosure, I left her to leave the travel box at her own speed, she then spent time (hours,) just standing motionless over the water bowl. Then this morning was standing with her nose in a different corner.

I have just changed things slightly, having put a new bark hide in for her, as well as an imitation plant & a larger water bowl & she has now retreated to her hide. The original one was obviously not to her liking.

T's are no different to any other creature, be they human, bird or animal. We may have similarities, but we also have differences & your murinus is just settling in, in her own way.

The way I helped my stirmi settle in was quiet darkness. I simply covered the front of her enclosure & left her to settle down & settle in.
 
I’m hoping my skeleton leg tarantula isn’t dying she hasn’t moved for four days and she’s not eating and she’s sitting still the whole time does anybody have any experience with this and know if this is normal or she might be molting
Possibly molting, if the temperature isnt too low in the room then I'm sure she or he is molting. I've had tarantulas become lethargic due to low temps. Give it a couple days along with fresh water and a temperature of 75 to 82 and a humidity of 60 to 70 percent by misting. If its molting it needs that humidity to slide out their old skin.
 
Possibly molting, if the temperature isnt too low in the room then I'm sure she or he is molting. I've had tarantulas become lethargic due to low temps. Give it a couple days along with fresh water and a temperature of 75 to 82 and a humidity of 60 to 70 percent by misting. If its molting it needs that humidity to slide out their old skin.
As long as her legs arent curled inward then she isnt dying, it's called the death curl. Send photos so I can see it.
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
As keepers say above, some species of tarantulas, particularly fossorials like yours, can take a long time to settle in, even a couple of weeks is not unheard of.
 

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