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Please help asap

Discussion in 'General Tarantula Discussion' started by jacob bott, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. jacob bott

    jacob bott New Member

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    So I noticed a white thing on my tarantulas abdomin, right above the spinerettes. I first saw it like a week ago and didn't think anything of it but now its way more noticeable and I'm getting worried, it doesn't look like normal feaceas, it looks more like an object. I'll put a picture so you can see for yourself. My tarantula is a B. Smithi and is a few years old around 4'. Please respond thank you.

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  2. Venom2090

    Venom2090 Member

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    Looks okay to me.. kind of looks like substrate.

    some closer pics would help.
  3. jacob bott

    jacob bott New Member

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    Ok I'll post a different picture
  4. Whitelightning777

    Whitelightning777 Active Member

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    Is it wild caught?

    Has it been exposed to parasites?

    Have you reduced temperature to attempt removal?


    ---

    FWIW, my Scorpion, which was wild caught was in a similar situation. Some Nimrod decided to "go fishing". There was a string lodged in its throat wrapped around the 2 front right legs.

    The scorp was highly agitated and refusing food.

    I carefully researched anesthesia options. Trying to pull it out with forceps proved futile, resulting in merely lifting the scorp in mid air.

    The 2 options were CO2 and low temperature. I first figured I'd try temperature. It was 50 degrees that night and I put her into a critter keeper for one hour outside.

    After she was chilled and practically immobile, but not completely, I used forceps to unwrap the legs. Much to my surprise, she slowly straightened out ask her legs front greatly assisting in the process. The string pulled out of her mouth. It was in there several inches.

    The tension relaxed and I immediately placed her back into her wide open cage and then reactivated the temperature controls. Within 2 or 3 hours, she was back to her ornary old self but far more comfortable.

    She ate food again. She would only take roaches, never anything else.

    Lately I found out she loves earthworms. I mean like snapping then out of midair or nailing them at full running speed, totally unlike her other behavior.

    The same approach might work with your T, but can't be considered totally safe until you discover the safe amount of cooking and avoid injuring her abdomen with forceps.

    I'm not saying do it. I'm saying research the living daylights out of that as an option.
  5. Venom2090

    Venom2090 Member

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    This is a common trend with you it seems. You don't understand scorpions and Tarantulas are different animals. With different requirements.
  6. plessey

    plessey Active Member 3 Year Member

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    Just looks like hairs that have been kicked but haven't come off the abomen properly. Seen this loads of times with Brachypelma.
    Metalman2004, Venom2090 and Enn49 like this.
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