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Why has my Avicularia not built a web?

animalgirl555

New Member
Messages
9
Location
United states of America
I was told to wait about a week as the T was still getting used to its surroundings. well, now it's been a week, and still no web. There are plenty of anchor points in the enclosure as well.
It's still reluctant to eat, although I think it ate a cricket a few days ago. I am beginning to worry, although I could just be overreacting.
Is this normal?
Thanks!
 

Enn49

Moderator
Staff member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Messages
10,932
Location
Malton, UK
You don't say how big your T is but slings will normally settle quite quickly whereas the larger they are the longer it takes for them to settle and construct their homes..
 

heyitsme

New Member
Messages
2
Location
chicago
I was told to wait about a week as the T was still getting used to its surroundings. well, now it's been a week, and still no web. There are plenty of anchor points in the enclosure as well.
It's still reluctant to eat, although I think it ate a cricket a few days ago. I am beginning to worry, although I could just be overreacting.
Is this normal?
Thanks!
Hey!

I don't have any good advice to offer, but I also brought home a new A. Avic as well so we are essentially on the same timeline :) Just wanted to say mine hasn't begun doing much webbing either, but has been eating well and explores the enclosure after nightfall. I'd be interested in comparing notes with you on how they both settle in over time , if you'd like!
 

animalgirl555

New Member
Messages
9
Location
United states of America
Hey!

I don't have any good advice to offer, but I also brought home a new A. Avic as well so we are essentially on the same timeline :) Just wanted to say mine hasn't begun doing much webbing either, but has been eating well and explores the enclosure after nightfall. I'd be interested in comparing notes with you on how they both settle in over time , if you'd like!
Sure! That sounds like a good idea. :)
 

Heretic

Member
Messages
60
Location
Indianapolis
For most creatures relocation stress is charted on a bell curve. The most stress is sub-adult to mid-adult while very young and very old dont give a rats poop about it. As in nature the young travel to new places as a force of biology and growth of a community. This allows the young to tolerate new environments. Once they have established their territory, and age, being forcefully moved upsets them. They are now living in fear of a place they didn't pick. It takes time to learn the area. Once they have grown accustomed and gain an understanding of interaction (you messing with them for YEARS) they accept new enclosures pretty quickly.
 
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