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New tarantula owner: I need advice!

animalgirl555

New Member
Messages
9
Location
United states of America
Hello! As it says in the title, I need some advice. Just yesterday I got a pet Avicularia avicularia (pink toe) tarantula from the Bug Fair! As of yesterday afternoon, my spider has just been clinging to the side of the enclosure. Is it just because it's new to this environment and is currently adjusting, or something else?

So, when is the best time to offer it food, and when should I expect it to build a web?

I just don't want to do anything wrong to my spider or end up with a problem, so any advice for a new time owner is appreciated!
Thanks!
 

PanzoN88

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Messages
1,906
Location
Ohio
Hello! As it says in the title, I need some advice. Just yesterday I got a pet Avicularia avicularia (pink toe) tarantula from the Bug Fair! As of yesterday afternoon, my spider has just been clinging to the side of the enclosure. Is it just because it's new to this environment and is currently adjusting, or something else?

So, when is the best time to offer it food, and when should I expect it to build a web?

I just don't want to do anything wrong to my spider or end up with a problem, so any advice for a new time owner is appreciated!
Thanks!
Sounds like it’s just not used to its surroundings yet. It will take a few day’s for it to get acclimated.

I would wait at least a week before feeding it, although you can attempt to feed it after another day or two if you wish. They will web a bit, just make sure there is plenty of foliage (fake or live, doesn’t matter) for the Avic to use as anchor points.

I read your post in the introductions section and saw the pictures. The container in the first picture is not what it’s in now correct?

Lastly, welcome to the forum and this very addicting hobby.
 

PanzoN88

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Messages
1,906
Location
Ohio
Hello! As it says in the title, I need some advice. Just yesterday I got a pet Avicularia avicularia (pink toe) tarantula from the Bug Fair! As of yesterday afternoon, my spider has just been clinging to the side of the enclosure. Is it just because it's new to this environment and is currently adjusting, or something else?

So, when is the best time to offer it food, and when should I expect it to build a web?

I just don't want to do anything wrong to my spider or end up with a problem, so any advice for a new time owner is appreciated!
Thanks!
Sounds like it’s just not used to its surroundings yet. It will take a few day’s for it to get acclimated.

I would wait at least a week before feeding it, although you can attempt to feed it after another day or two if you wish. They will web a bit, just make sure there is plenty of foliage (fake or live, doesn’t matter) for the Avic to use as anchor points.

I read your post in the introductions section and saw the pictures. The container in the first picture is not what it’s in now correct?

Lastly, welcome to the forum and this very addicting hobby.
Just looked at the second picture in your other thread, disregard paragraph 3 of my previous post, though I am still curious what its enclosure looks like.
 

animalgirl555

New Member
Messages
9
Location
United states of America
@PnazoN88 here are the pictures of my tarantula enclosure. Sorry they're so blurry, but I'm pretty bad at taking pictures!
20230523_162937.jpg
 

Stan Schultz

Member
3 Year Member
Messages
59
Location
Anywhere in North America.
@PnazoN88 here are the pictures of my tarantula enclosure. Sorry they're so blurry, but I'm pretty bad at taking pictures!
View attachment 70793
Just my personal opinions...
Too much junk in the cage, especially all the foliage. The tarantula will only build its nest in or behind it, and may only be seen at 3:00 AM every second Thursday. (Well, not exactly. But you get the idea.) Also, because A. avicularia are among the most arboreal of the arboreal tarantulas, all that stuff on the cage floor is just going to be a good place for dead crickets and other detritus to accumulate. And it makes keeping the cage clean very difficult. It does nothing for the tarantula.

Also, keep in mind that in the wild, they almost always move upward almost as far as they can to avoid predators and enjoy gentle breezes (i.e., lots of ventilation). Same in a cage. Since they normally prefer "up," they will usually persist in building their nests at the top of the cage, right under or even attached to the upper surface. That makes opening a cage with a removable, top cover for periodic servicing a pain in the fundament because there is little way to avoid damaging or destroying the attached nest so the cage can cleaned and the water dish filled. See the section on arboreal tarantulas in The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, beginning on page 246 for a more detailed discussion and a much better plan. (You don't have to buy the book. Your neighborhood, public library either already has a copy or can get one for you for check out.)

Attached is a photo (Larry Loose, with permission) of an Avicularia nest under a thatched roof in Costa Rica. Note the complete lack of foliage, rocks, or other "scenic" paraphernalia. There's a shed skin tucked into the bottom of the tubular nest (a good place to get it out of the way!). And if you look carefully you might just barely discern the outline of the occupant (quite happy in spite of the austere, "Japanese" furnishings) inside the upper section. Most of the stuff in the photo you presented is there because of a misguided perception, instilled in the owner/designer by Hollywood, of what a jungle really looks like.

Enjoy your little eight-legged buddy!

Stan Schultz
 

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animalgirl555

New Member
Messages
9
Location
United states of America
Just my personal opinions...
Too much junk in the cage, especially all the foliage. The tarantula will only build its nest in or behind it, and may only be seen at 3:00 AM every second Thursday. (Well, not exactly. But you get the idea.) Also, because A. avicularia are among the most arboreal of the arboreal tarantulas, all that stuff on the cage floor is just going to be a good place for dead crickets and other detritus to accumulate. And it makes keeping the cage clean very difficult. It does nothing for the tarantula.

Also, keep in mind that in the wild, they almost always move upward almost as far as they can to avoid predators and enjoy gentle breezes (i.e., lots of ventilation). Same in a cage. Since they normally prefer "up," they will usually persist in building their nests at the top of the cage, right under or even attached to the upper surface. That makes opening a cage with a removable, top cover for periodic servicing a pain in the fundament because there is little way to avoid damaging or destroying the attached nest so the cage can cleaned and the water dish filled. See the section on arboreal tarantulas in The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, beginning on page 246 for a more detailed discussion and a much better plan. (You don't have to buy the book. Your neighborhood, public library either already has a copy or can get one for you for check out.)

Attached is a photo (Larry Loose, with permission) of an Avicularia nest under a thatched roof in Costa Rica. Note the complete lack of foliage, rocks, or other "scenic" paraphernalia. There's a shed skin tucked into the bottom of the tubular nest (a good place to get it out of the way!). And if you look carefully you might just barely discern the outline of the occupant (quite happy in spite of the austere, "Japanese" furnishings) inside the upper section. Most of the stuff in the photo you presented is there because of a misguided perception, instilled in the owner/designer by Hollywood, of what a jungle really looks like.

Enjoy your little eight-legged buddy!

Stan Schultz
Hi! Thanks for the advice!
I gonna be honest, I was pretty confused as to what to put in the enclosure, so I'll take some stuff out. I'm just used to setting up mouse enclosures, because mice need their enclosures, well, crowded. :)
Thanks again!
 

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