• Are you a Tarantula hobbyist? If so, we invite you to join our community! Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your pets and enclosures and chat with other Tarantula enthusiasts. Sign up today!

Beautiful new tarantula! What can I expect from a tropical species?

Allthingsterrarium

Active Member
3 Year Member
Hi guys! It's been a while since I've posted! My cousin moved out of state yesterday and considering she's going to be staying with friends who have kids she felt it probably wasn't a good idea to bring along her three tarantulas. Two of them are finding new homes now and she gave me her Brazilian red and white tarantula (nhandu chromatus) I'm going to ask her about the specific care requirements but I thought it would probably wise to also ask you guys. I have no experience with tropical tarantulas, let alone this species or genus. I've only kept two species so far and that is my current two, a Mexican fireleg and Mexican red knee. Both desert species. What can I expect from a rainforest tarantula and what is the best way to care for a red and white? I'm mostly concerned about humidity. Should I just mist with a spray bottle like for a tropical lizard or snake? I doubt I did but have a vague memory of hearing that it's best not to get water droplets on a tarantula's hairs. Maybe I just assumed that since I wondered if humidity would stick to them.
 

Allthingsterrarium

Active Member
3 Year Member
Hi guys! It's been a while since I've posted! My cousin moved out of state yesterday and considering she's going to be staying with friends who have kids she felt it probably wasn't a good idea to bring along her three tarantulas. Two of them are finding new homes now and she gave me her Brazilian red and white tarantula (nhandu chromatus) I'm going to ask her about the specific care requirements but I thought it would probably wise to also ask you guys. I have no experience with tropical tarantulas, let alone this species or genus. I've only kept two species so far and that is my current two, a Mexican fireleg and Mexican red knee. Both desert species. What can I expect from a rainforest tarantula and what is the best way to care for a red and white? I'm mostly concerned about humidity. Should I just mist with a spray bottle like for a tropical lizard or snake? I doubt I did but have a vague memory of hearing that it's best not to get water droplets on a tarantula's hairs. Maybe I just assumed that since I wondered if humidity would stick to them.
I forgot to mention. The Wikipedia article on the nhandu chromatus contains this sentence here

"The Brazilian red and white tarantulas large size, skittish demeanor, and urticating hairs means that it should not be handled except by an experienced person."

I have handle this individual spider, albeit briefly, once before when I helped my cousin clean the habitat. No problems but he/she is still pretty small, maybe 2 inches or just under. Are they normally aggressive?
 

Allthingsterrarium

Active Member
3 Year Member
Chromatus tend to be abit skittish in my experience but not defensive. I wouldn’t recommend handling thou as their hairs are no joke.
as for care they do just fine with a hide and overflowing a water dish from time to time.
Thanks Rs50matt! That's good to hear! Should be no problem then! I'll just care for this one like my other two for the most part.

Yeah he definitely kicks! When I took him out to clean the habitat he must have done it extremely fast because I didn't even notice he did until I saw some hairs floating around in the air. It was a little tense. He moves extremely fast and kept turning around and making defense postures at the forceps I was using to nudge him into a separate container.
 

octanejunkie

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Do you need to remove the spider the clean? It's their home, I tend to just police after them and only remove to rehouse.

My experience with Nhandu sp is skittish if disturbed but if you approach calmly and smoothly and don't startle them they are pretty chill and tend to be out as adults.
 

Allthingsterrarium

Active Member
3 Year Member
Do you need to remove the spider the clean? It's their home, I tend to just police after them and only remove to rehouse.

My experience with Nhandu sp is skittish if disturbed but if you approach calmly and smoothly and don't startle them they are pretty chill and tend to be out as adults.

Well, I've always taken out my fireleg and red knee when I clean their habitats to avoid stressing them too much with all the shuffling around in there. Then again those two are more easy going so it's hard to say for sure.

He/she certainly is skittish but my cousin does say he/she has a really good personality. Bold enough to be out exploring at night at least. I'm glad there's a good chance of a friendlier spider over time as the spider matures. I'll certainly be sure not make any sudden movements and go at the pace he/she wants me to.
 

Arachnoclown

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
I would at least cup a Nhandu during maintenance being new to tarantulas. They can be a little on the aggressive side...even as tiny little juveniles. Plus the hairs really suck.
20200215_215618.jpg
20200215_215736.jpg
 

WolfSpider

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
I am an urticaria hair hyper-reactor. Therefore I tend toward Psalmos as new worlds. But I have been darn lucky with my AF N. chromatus. Nary a flicked hair--ever. Still quite skittish, but I don't think she even realizes that she has this defense mechanism. Individuals in a species and all that.
 

Allthingsterrarium

Active Member
3 Year Member
I would at least cup a Nhandu during maintenance being new to tarantulas. They can be a little on the aggressive side...even as tiny little juveniles. Plus the hairs really suck.View attachment 54057View attachment 54058

Good plan! He's (I'll go with he for now) not particularly unfriendly but he's not outgoing either. I'd rather not startle/stress him into self defense mode. Yours' is absolutely gorgeous! I'll have to get a picture of mine for you guys!
 

Allthingsterrarium

Active Member
3 Year Member
I am an urticaria hair hyper-reactor. Therefore I tend toward Psalmos as new worlds. But I have been darn lucky with my AF N. chromatus. Nary a flicked hair--ever. Still quite skittish, but I don't think she even realizes that she has this defense mechanism. Individuals in a species and all that.

Same here! You can never completely read them! My two brachypelma aren't aggressive but they certainly seem to have mood swings! Some days they'll protest me trying to pick them up but otherwise cooperate and other days they'll rear up and posture at me and want nothing to do with me. I'm not overly sensitive to the hair myself but I do get itchy after holding them so I don't handle them often anymore. My fireleg's a big kicker, he loves to flick hairs at the slightest disturbance. On the other hand my red knee is usually more relaxed but sometimes, especially after molting, he likes to kick as much as his brother.
 

timc

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Sounds about the size of mine, 2”. I’ve done one rehouse that was just a threat posture the entire time, pretty cute. They’re going to appreciate their substrate a bit more wet than your scrubland species (no tarantulas I’m aware of live in actual sandy deserts), but not sopping wet or anything. Don’t spay, just use a dropper of some sort to wet the substrate directly. Humidity is a useless number to chase, don’t worry about it. If your spider stays on the walls 100% of the time, it’s too wet. Overall, in my limited experience, great spider. A little food aggressive and doesn’t hesitate to kick hairs. Should be fun to raise!
 

Allthingsterrarium

Active Member
3 Year Member
Sounds about the size of mine, 2”. I’ve done one rehouse that was just a threat posture the entire time, pretty cute. They’re going to appreciate their substrate a bit more wet than your scrubland species (no tarantulas I’m aware of live in actual sandy deserts), but not sopping wet or anything. Don’t spay, just use a dropper of some sort to wet the substrate directly. Humidity is a useless number to chase, don’t worry about it. If your spider stays on the walls 100% of the time, it’s too wet. Overall, in my limited experience, great spider. A little food aggressive and doesn’t hesitate to kick hairs. Should be fun to raise!

Thanks timc! Of my cousin's three tarantulas this one was definitely my favorite so I'm glad to be able to take him in for her! The humidity doesn't sound hard at all and I think just trying to keep the substrate a little damp is a great idea! He's usually on the ground instead of the grass and right now there's some slightly damp areas and some dryer areas so I'll try and keep it how it is now!
 
Top