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Tarantula Feeding problem

Discussion in 'Tarantula Feeding and Feeder Insects' started by Sonny Red, May 13, 2017.

  1. Sonny Red

    Sonny Red New Member

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    Hello, I'm in need of some advice. I have a female rose hair tarantula and a while ago she had a mold problem in her enclosure, the mold even grew on her back. I cleaned the enclosure very well and made sure no mold spores survived. I put her in a bone dry environment as I was recommended. However five months after her new enclosure, the mold on her back still has not died to my surprise since the enclosure is dry, the mold never seemed to affect her health. The first few months in her new enclosure she's been eating ok, but recently she stopped eating completely. She will refuse to eat her crickets, she even kind of acts defensive towards them. Im not sure if she is succumbing to the mold or if she's not comfortable. She does not seem dehydrated at all. Does anyone have advice on how I could get her to eat or any theories on why she is acting this way? I would apreciate it! I'm sorry for such the long message have a great day!
  2. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Fasting is common in G.rosea but it could also be that she's in premoult. A moult may get rid of any mould left on her.
  3. Sonny Red

    Sonny Red New Member

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    But she has been fasting for about over a month. I will try to post a picture of her soon I won't be around for a couple days.
    CrypticSpider likes this.
  4. MassExodus

    MassExodus Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I've had them fast for over a year ;) Nothing to worry about unless her abdomen is small, just keep fresh water in a small dish and keep her enclosure bone dry, as you've been doing. She'll be fine, and hopefully molt out of the moldy exo soon. I've actually never heard of that happening..sounds like it was a close thing, honestly. It's good that you researched and started keeping her dry. Hope this helps.
    WolfSpider and CrypticSpider like this.
  5. CrypticSpider

    CrypticSpider Well-Known Member 3 Year Member

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    Yes, please do post a good, clear pic when you can. I would like to see it, to further advise, if possible.
  6. Sonny Red

    Sonny Red New Member

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    I think I might of screwed up on that. I've been keeping water out of her new enclosure because I didn't want the mold to grow back in the enclosure and didn't want it to progress in her body. Should I give water? Because I thought rosies didn't need water and got moisture from food since they're desert dwellers. I'm pretty concerned about putting water back in there I don't want mold spores from her body to spread from the moisture and grow in her book lungs or anywhere else internal. Her abdomen does not look dehydrated from what I could tell.
  7. kormath

    kormath Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    the water dish is used to control humidity in the enclosure, they'll rarely drink from it. Both of my rosea's will flip the dish over every time i fill it. So i'll wait for the substrate to dry and then flip the dish back over and fill it again. It's a game for us now.

    So yes, rosea are an arid species but they do need some humidity. In the wild, if i can remember what i read, the ambient humidity in their environment is like 30-40% but in the burrows it can reach up to 50% or so.
  8. Sonny Red

    Sonny Red New Member

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    Should I put water back in? I just don't want the mold on her exoskeleton to progress or grow internal that's why I was planning on keeping it dry until she molts. But should I give water or is it too risky?
  9. Sonny Red

    Sonny Red New Member

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    image.jpg all the little white spots on her is the mold. The biggest spot is right in the middle of her carapace.
  10. Sonny Red

    Sonny Red New Member

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    Should I put water back in her enclosure? Is it too risky that the mold will grow back? I just don't want her to get an internal infection. And do u have any advice on how I could get her to eat again?
  11. kormath

    kormath Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Rosea are famous for fasting. She'll eat when she's ready. if you're sure she's not going into premolt, offer food once or twice a week, remove it the next day if she didn't eat it.
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