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Some tips in case you get bitten

Hi all,

I saw a thread on here about what to do if you get bitten by a tarantula, and it attracted some (what I interpreted as) satirical responses. Having some emergency medical care knowledge, I thought I'd share my two cents on what to do in case you get bitten.

1. As with any puncture wound, especially one with venom, you're gonna want to wash out the wound with water. Avoid using any chemicals to air on the side of caution, just in case they react with any component of the venom.

2. Cover the wound with a bandage to prevent bacteria from getting into the wound.

3. If your wound or the area around it starts swelling up, or you feel any signs of an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing, hives, extreme pain or itching, redness of the skin), seek professional medical help right away.

4. Take an antihistamine or ibuprofen.

5. Like others have said, if you get bitten by an old world tarantula with some really potent and possibly paralyzing venom, seek medical help right away.

As for the tarantula,

1. Make sure its fangs are okay, they aren't necessarily meant to bite into human flesh

2. Monitor it to make sure it's 100% okay, and not exhibiting any odd behavior.

3. It may be a good idea to feed it, as it could be hungry and have thought you were food.

If I got anything wrong, please feel free to correct me!
 

Grape Apple Pie

Member
Tarantula Club Member
Hi all,

I saw a thread on here about what to do if you get bitten by a tarantula, and it attracted some (what I interpreted as) satirical responses. Having some emergency medical care knowledge, I thought I'd share my two cents on what to do in case you get bitten.

1. As with any puncture wound, especially one with venom, you're gonna want to wash out the wound with water. Avoid using any chemicals to air on the side of caution, just in case they react with any component of the venom.

2. Cover the wound with a bandage to prevent bacteria from getting into the wound.

3. If your wound or the area around it starts swelling up, or you feel any signs of an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing, hives, extreme pain or itching, redness of the skin), seek professional medical help right away.

4. Take an antihistamine or ibuprofen.

5. Like others have said, if you get bitten by an old world tarantula with some really potent and possibly paralyzing venom, seek medical help right away.

As for the tarantula,

1. Make sure its fangs are okay, they aren't necessarily meant to bite into human flesh

2. Monitor it to make sure it's 100% okay, and not exhibiting any odd behavior.

3. It may be a good idea to feed it, as it could be hungry and have thought you were food.

If I got anything wrong, please feel free to correct me!

I like most of it. And I'm not be facetious, but 3 and 5 to seek medical help? In all my days I can't recall anyone going to the hospital for a tarantula bite. Almost 100% of people that get bit run to the internet to tell about it, or they are already on You of Tube streaming the incident while it happens. Lol

Maybe 20 years ago I might have read something about someone going to the hospital, but if I even remember it right, all they got was a Grape Apple Pie band-aid and a stern " Dont do it again".

Other than that I think you summed it up well. Good job.
 

timc

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
I like most of it. And I'm not be facetious, but 3 and 5 to seek medical help? In all my days I can't recall anyone going to the hospital for a tarantula bite. Almost 100% of people that get bit run to the internet to tell about it, or they are already on You of Tube streaming the incident while it happens. Lol

Maybe 20 years ago I might have read something about someone going to the hospital, but if I even remember it right, all they got was a Grape Apple Pie band-aid and a stern " Dont do it again".

Other than that I think you summed it up well. Good job.
Rob C (tarantulaguy1976) has an old video of him getting ready to go to the hospital after being bitten by an ornata I believe. However, I do imagine all he got was a $135 bandaid and was told not to do it again lol.

I won’t discuss the merits of his videos here but that one does stick out in my mind from when tarantula content on the tube was rather scarce. All I could think was “BAM!” Lol
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Tarantula Club Member
If anyone gets any reaction to a bite that concerns them, then getting medical advice makes sense. But the problem is, NHS 111 works to a script that will almost certainly not have T bite on it, so they will not have a clue & if you do go direct to casualty, even with the scientific name of the T, there is not a lot they can do, as virtually nothing is known about T venom. Plus there is normally a wait of several hours to get treatment at casualty & I am not sure how far up, or down the casualty priority list a T bite will go.
 

Arachnoclown

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Heres my first aid...plus some benadryl.
20190510_202717.jpg

Please if someone actually has a allergic reaction please document it. You'll be the first one ever to of had one.
 

Arachnoclown

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Photos of Poecilotheria ornata bite. It actually dislocated my pinky...still not sure how. Surface wounds almost nonexistent but internal deep pain was intense. One fang pierced clear through. Only went to the ER because I couldn't reset my finger. They gave me a huge amount of benadryl and numbed the finger to reset. Half a bottle of tequila helped out alot. Cramping in my pinky lasted for a few months afterwards.
20190830_174313.jpg
20190830_174321.jpg
20190830_174302.jpg
 

ABYZL

Member
If anyone gets any reaction to a bite that concerns them, then getting medical advice makes sense. But the problem is, NHS 111 works to a script that will almost certainly not have T bite on it, so they will not have a clue & if you do go direct to casualty, even with the scientific name of the T, there is not a lot they can do, as virtually nothing is known about T venom. Plus there is normally a wait of several hours to get treatment at casualty & I am not sure how far up, or down the casualty priority list a T bite will go.
I experienced this for a false widow bite. I got hassled into getting advice 24 hours after it occurred as it had a red ring around it and I have allergies, 111 were concerned and wanted me seen at A&E, the consultant was pretty confused but when I explained what it was he agreed with me that a serious histamine reaction would have kicked in immediately or at least the same day and there was no sign of necrosis so I was given antibiotics in case of infection and didn't end up needing them.
 

Combat Advantage

Active Member
Just one caution, maybe two.

1. Drugs don't mix. Generally there aren't formal studies on taking this and that with x # subjects. However, there's lots of clinical evidence of mixing things like Tylenol. Organ damage can happen rapidly without realizing it. It happens at hospitals often and home use of OTC meds. Common mistake is taking Tylenol for a hangover. The liver can't handle the toxic alcohol since the liver is basically shut down for a time, to simplify it.

2. Bees/wasps are the most common killers in north America. I knew an experienced emergency room physician that didn't know the difference between a honey bee and a paper wasp. I didn't trust his knowledge base to put my health in his hands. He wanted me to bring Rattlers to "train his staff".....
No it was more like milk and make some extra $ more than likely.
YMMV Because doctors do. Just because they work in a hospital doesn't mean that they will do much more than check pub med, a pdr, run up insurance with ten thousand dollars of unnecessary tests and expose you to harmful treatments. I'm not saying that you should never go. Just do your homework because they have not. They will have a protocol that follows the"standard of care" rules of the hospital. It may or may not be qualified for good outcomes. Talk to them ahead of time and you might get an answer.....not in my local experience.
I will guess that the protocol likely will be.

Antihistamine

Antibiotics

Steroid

Multiple blood work

Poor ArClown ended up with x rays and he only knows what else.....good grief what a bite to dislocate a finger...

In my town, it will likely be $10k +/-, unless you have good insurance, then they will max out your card.

I've been bitten by lots of unusual critters, but fortunately not a T, or any hot snakes.
The others were sometimes serious, especially stings that affected my breathing. All good experiences since I'm here to talk about them.
 

ABYZL

Member
Just one caution, maybe two.

1. Drugs don't mix. Generally there aren't formal studies on taking this and that with x # subjects. However, there's lots of clinical evidence of mixing things like Tylenol. Organ damage can happen rapidly without realizing it. It happens at hospitals often and home use of OTC meds. Common mistake is taking Tylenol for a hangover. The liver can't handle the toxic alcohol since the liver is basically shut down for a time, to simplify it.

2. Bees/wasps are the most common killers in north America. I knew an experienced emergency room physician that didn't know the difference between a honey bee and a paper wasp. I didn't trust his knowledge base to put my health in his hands. He wanted me to bring Rattlers to "train his staff".....
No it was more like milk and make some extra $ more than likely.
YMMV Because doctors do. Just because they work in a hospital doesn't mean that they will do much more than check pub med, a pdr, run up insurance with ten thousand dollars of unnecessary tests and expose you to harmful treatments. I'm not saying that you should never go. Just do your homework because they have not. They will have a protocol that follows the"standard of care" rules of the hospital. It may or may not be qualified for good outcomes. Talk to them ahead of time and you might get an answer.....not in my local experience.
I will guess that the protocol likely will be.

Antihistamine

Antibiotics

Steroid

Multiple blood work

Poor ArClown ended up with x rays and he only knows what else.....good grief what a bite to dislocate a finger...

In my town, it will likely be $10k +/-, unless you have good insurance, then they will max out your card.

I've been bitten by lots of unusual critters, but fortunately not a T, or any hot snakes.
The others were sometimes serious, especially stings that affected my breathing. All good experiences since I'm here to talk about them.
My medical knowledge is basic but sufficient to agree with your very good advice. Loads of people really don't understand drug interactions let alone the potential interactions between venom and various drugs. I'm allergic to literally all pain killers apart from those that would be sourced from tarantula venom in the first place so if I do get bitten it's just a case of antihistamines and otherwise riding it out which I agree is the best practice in any case. As you say Tylenol or paracetamol here in the UK is rough on the liver which isn't ideal when there is already a toxin present and ibuprofen can accelerate and worsen allergic reactions. You've made very sound points. I feel like it might be worth keepers of venomous pets should have an info file ready for medical professionals in the case of a bite. My scorpion is harmless but I have a couple of spicy T's and am adding a foxface to my marine tank. This makes me think it would be worth keeping an epipen to hand just in case I find I'm allergic after being bitten or stung. The only other danger pets I have are my green spotted puffers but they are poisonous rather than venomous so only a risk if for instance one was injured and I had a point of entry on my skin while dealing with it. Long odds but I still feel like it's important for emergency response to know somehow that tetrodotoxin would be the reason I was suddenly completely paralysed, it can be quickly fatal but treatable if dealt with in a timely manner. Do you keep rattlers then? I have a real soft spot for them, lovely characters and no problem if treated with respect :)
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Tarantula Club Member
I wouldn’t recommend taking Benadryl with alcohol, side effects can be dangerous.

Over the counter medications don't usually have any harmful effects, unless taken in doses well above the recommended doses. It is why they are seen as safe to sell without any medical advice. And looking at the British National Formulary for the acrivastine listing. Acrivastine is the active ingredient in the brand name Benardyl. All that it says in relation to alcohol is, it "may" cause drowsiness. And although acrivastine is normally presented as a non sedating antihistamine, drowsiness is always a potential with antihistamines.
 

Arachnoclown

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
I wouldn’t recommend taking Benadryl with alcohol, side effects can be dangerous.
I appreciate your concern but the attending ER doctors new what they gave me and my plans for the rest if the evening. They even offered a ****tail for the pain to start the party before I got home and I passed on it.
 

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