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Sick or Dying Rose Hair?

meiryrodriguez

New Member
Hello Everyone,

I'm new to this forum but I've had my Chilean Rose Hair for 14 years. I'm not exactly sure how old she is because she was given to me, but I'm guessing 15 or 16. Recently she's stopped eating and started spending a lot of time sitting in her water dish. Her abdomen is also shrinking. She's fasted for months before, but she's never gotten thinner. She's the only tarantula I own or have ever owned. I don't handle her, and I'm not prepared to do any sophisticated triage. I feel like she's had a pretty good run, but is there any simple thing I can do to make her comfortable or help her?

I changed out her substrate a few months ago, and washed out her tank with vinegar and water. Her behavior changed shortly after that. TBH, I don't clean out her tank nearly as much as I should so I don't know if that had something to do with her change in behavior. I used the same substrate I alway used and really gave her dish and log a good cleaning because they were pretty gross.

I'm wondering if she's just reaching the end of her life?

Welcome any constructive insight. Thank you.
 

meiryrodriguez

New Member
Rose hairs live for 35-40 years so I wouldnt say she's at the end of her life.
Whens the last time she molted?
Can you upload a photo of her and the enclosure?
It's been probably been 3 years since she last molted. She usually lays down webbing first, and she has not done that. It's hard to get good photos with the glare, but here are a couple.
 

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Casey K.

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Do you add sugar to her water dish water or use a dropper and try to give it to her directly?

It depends on her physical state. Is she not moving at all? Lethargic? If that's the case a water dropper directly into the mouth may be necessary. If she can move around then I would just add it to her water dish. Don't use tap water. Try using a bottle of purified spring water, instead.
 

Arachnoclown

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Both pine and cedar are toxic to insects and invertebrates. Even that hide is not good. Get yourself some coco fiber as soon as possible. You can place her in a deli cup with a couple airholes in it for a day or so till you change things up. Make sure to leave her water to drink in the deli cup also.
 

meiryrodriguez

New Member
Both pine and cedar are toxic to insects and invertebrates. Even that hide is not good. Get yourself some coco fiber as soon as possible. You can place her in a deli cup with a couple airholes in it for a day or so till you change things up. Make sure to leave her water to drink in the deli cup also.
The substrate is not pine or cedar. The bottom layer is coco fiber and there's a layer of Zoo Med Forest Floor on top which is cypress, I believe. And you were right, she started molting this morning. Though she did not flip on to her back and now she's laying sort of sideways, with one side of her legs under her, so I am a bit concerned.
 

Arachnoclown

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Glad to hear she's molting.
Cypress wood is a sensitizer. Not a good choice for a spider. Any type of wood is not good. Sharp jagged edges to walk around on would be unpleasant on their abdomens. They need something soft and moist to dig in. Coco fiber, peatmoss, topsoil....any of these work great for spiders. A spider is supposed to burrow to feel safer and less exposed. Your spider can't do what it needs to do. Just my observations. Good luck
 

meiryrodriguez

New Member
Glad to hear she's molting.
Cypress wood is a sensitizer. Not a good choice for a spider. Any type of wood is not good. Sharp jagged edges to walk around on would be unpleasant on their abdomens. They need something soft and moist to dig in. Coco fiber, peatmoss, topsoil....any of these work great for spiders. A spider is supposed to burrow to feel safer and less exposed. Your spider can't do what it needs to do. Just my observations. Good luck
Thank you for all the information!

So she's molted but her carapace and abdomen appear to be stuck?! I was hoping they would off overnight, but so far nothing. Any ideas? Should I mist her with water?
 

Casey K.

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Thank you for all the information!

So she's molted but her carapace and abdomen appear to be stuck?! I was hoping they would off overnight, but so far nothing. Any ideas? Should I mist her with water?
Pour water directly around her. Do not mist her directly. Make sure the soil is nice and damp underneath her.
 

Oursapoil

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Tarantula Club Member
Casey will definitely have better advises but I have been lucky a few times by misting (not spraying) the T with spring water every two hours. If you can increase the temperature to at least 80-85 degrees. After 4 hours I would gently try (long tweezers) to pull the still attached molt.
 
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