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US Selling off part of collection

wdulaney

Active Member
Hello,

I have decided to sell off part of my collection:

E. Murinus 6 inch (probable female, will come with a glass tank) (local pickup only) - $50
A. Avicularia 3.5 inch - $50
A. Avicularia .25 inch - $15
G. Rosea 1 inch - $60
G.Rosea 3 inch (female) - $150
G. Pulchra 5 inch ( penultimate male) - $250
B. Hamorii 4 inch ( female) - $200
B. Albiceps 4 inch ( female) - 225
B. Emilia 3.5 - 4 inch ( female) - $225
T.Albo. .5 inch - $10
A. Bicoloratum 2.5-3 inch ( female) - $300
B.Klassi .75-1 inch - $100
M.Balfouri 3.5-4 inch (female) (local pickup only) - $225

TOS: Will only ship if order is over $100 before shipping charges. Shipping is based on location. LAG is included, however you must contact me within 3 hours of unpacking Ts and finding one dead. Pictures will be needed to confirm DOAs.

Located in Prattville AL
 

Casey K.

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Sure do wish you'd ship that female E. murinus..... :)

If you would, I'd be willing to buy the 3.5" avic, too.
 

Casey K.

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If I knew I wouldn't get bit, I would lol

She is very mean

Just a matter of being patient. :) Do not risk injury to her, though if you are uncomfortable. I understand. :) I really would love to have her, though.
 

octanejunkie

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I bet you I could show you how to wrangle her without any threat to you or her...
 

octanejunkie

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H
What is your recommendation?
Send pics of the tank she's in, if that's your concern

I use catch cups like @Casey K. said, learned from Tom Moran

I think the biggest challenge for most folks is getting the T out of the enclosure. I can tell you how to do that best if I see the setup

Busy af today but will respond tonight if you need me
 

wdulaney

Active Member
Send pics of the tank she's in, if that's your concern

I use catch cups like @Casey K. said, learned from Tom Moran

I think the biggest challenge for most folks is getting the T out of the enclosure. I can tell you how to do that best if I see the setup

Busy af today but will respond tonight if you need me
 

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Casey K.

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I would put a catch cup at the entrance of her burrow and slide tongs down the back side of her hide and gently coax her to the entry hole....then she should just go right on in the catch cup.
 

octanejunkie

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Thanks for the pics

Prepare a shipping container per the video linked. Depending on the size of the spider, the shipping container could be a pill vial or a large deli cup. The idea is to minimize "free space" inside the shipping container in both length and width. Make sure the shipping container/vial has a few air holes in it, and in the lid, for ventilation.

Using paper towels you will create a cavern inside the shipping vessel with paper towels, concentrically rolled inside the container, the ID of the cavern being not much larger than the spider itself. Start with placing a folded paper towel at the bottom of the cup and start rolling paper towels into the container. The idea is to create a "cushioning cocoon" of sorts that you will dampen AFTER the spider is in it. I spray some water into the far end of the cup before loading the spider in it to make things easier. Have the shipping container ready BEFORE you plan to extract the spider from it's enclosure.

Then, I would do as Casey suggests, using a 32 oz catch cup with holes large enough for a long zip tie to fit through on all sides and the rear of the cup. You will want a piece of cardboard slightly larger than the opening of the cup to "cap it with" but not too big to be clumsy or snag on anything.

As long as you know where her burrow is, you can position the cup at the mouth of her burrow and VERY GENTLY coax her out into the cup. This is where the most planning comes into play. You do NOT want to leave a gap between the burrow opening and the cup, the spider WILL FIND THE GAP.

What I have done with other burrowed spiders is locate them inside the burrow and using chopsticks or similar, push them through the substrate BEHIND the spider moving them towards the mouth of the burrow, and the cup, blocking their retreat back into the burrow. Have lots of chopsticks handy and be sure to go slowly. I have done this with just one chopstick. The spider will want to move away from the stick, especially if you insert it and wiggle the stick, directing the spider towards the cup.

They will NOT BE HAPPY but they will go into the cup, often with a vengeance. Be prepared for that. Once you have moved the spider into the cup, cap it with the cardboard and transport it to your loading bay lol

Often the use of damp washcloths comes in handy, like when doing tank maintenance, to keep the spider in their burrow for example. I don't like using anything opaque when cupping the spider, I want to see as much as possible. The only exception to that being if the burrow has more than one exit. In that case I will plug the entrance I don't want them to use with wet washcloths. They don't care for soft, fabric type 'squishy' but if they are angry enough they will hulk smash things, so a wet, heavy cloth is a deterrent.

Spider in catch cup
Put the catch cup and the shipping cup mouth-to-mouth and coax the spider out of the catch cup into the shipping vessel. If the catch cup is larger than the shipping container I would use a cap with a hole in it to reduce the openings to match. The last thing you want is an angry spider coming loose away from it's enclosure and safety of it's burrow.

Using a zip tie, it's soft plastic and won't harm them. Coax the spider through the holes in the catch cup into the shipping container. She will go. It's a dark, small space which will be "safer" to her than being exposed in the catch cup.

Once she is in the cup, cover the opening with another paper towel, dampen in several spots and seal up the shipping cup. Put a strip of painters tape over the lid, securing the lid. Package for shipping, add ice pack or heat pack as weather dictates and you are good.

I usually don't package till the day of shipping as close to shipping time as possible.

The spider will be secure and comfortable inside the shipping container but we always want to minimize stress and the amount of time in the cocoon - although they are safer in there than you would think. Remember, in nature they will stuff themselves into tight spaces to hide, so this is a natural, and it cushions them from boxes being dropped, thrown or who knows what.

As long as the spider is not in premolt, it will be fine. Don't soak the paper towels and don't ship dry.
Watch the video, think it through, be prepared (measure twice, cut once, so to speak) and once you start there is no turning back lol just get er done.

Sorry for the long post
Let us know how it works out, and please, no bite report; okay thanks
 
Last edited:

Casey K.

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Thanks for the pics

Prepare a shipping container per the video linked. Depending on the size of the spider, the shipping container could be a pill vial or a large deli cup. The idea is to minimize "free space" inside the shipping container in both length and width. Make sure the shipping container/vial has a few air holes in it, and in the lid, for ventilation.

Using paper towels you will create a cavern inside the shipping vessel with paper towels, concentrically rolled inside the container, the ID of the cavern being not much larger than the spider itself. Start with placing a folded paper towel at the bottom of the cup and start rolling paper towels into the container. The idea is to create a "cushioning cocoon" of sorts that you will dampen AFTER the spider is in it. I spray some water into the far end of the cup before loading the spider in it to make things easier. Have the shipping container ready BEFORE you plan to extract the spider from it's enclosure.

Then, I would do as Casey suggests, using a 32 oz catch cup with holes large enough for a long zip tie to fit through on all sides and the rear of the cup. You will want a piece of cardboard slightly larger than the opening of the cup to "cap it with" but not too big to be clumsy or snag on anything.

As long as you know where her burrow is, you can position the cup at the mouth of her burrow and VERY GENTLY coax her out into the cup. This is where the most planning comes into play. You do NOT want to leave a gap between the burrow opening and the cup, the spider WILL FIND THE GAP.

What I have done with other burrowed spiders is locate them inside the burrow and using chopsticks or similar, push them through the substrate BEHIND the spider moving them towards the mouth of the burrow, and the cup, blocking their retreat back into the burrow. Have lots of chopsticks handy and be sure to go slowly. I have done this with just one chopstick. The spider will want to move away from the stick, especially if you insert it and wiggle the stick, directing the spider towards the cup.

They will NOT BE HAPPY but they will go into the cup, often with a vengeance. Be prepared for that. Once you have moved the spider into the cup, cap it with the cardboard and transport it to your loading bay lol

Often the use of damp washcloths comes in handy, like when doing tank maintenance, to keep the spider in their burrow for example. I don't like using anything opaque when cupping the spider, I want to see as much as possible. The only exception to that being if the burrow has more than one exit. In that case I will plug the entrance I don't want them to use with wet washcloths. They don't care for soft, fabric type 'squishy' but if they are angry enough they will hulk smash things, so a wet, heavy cloth is a deterrent.

Spider in catch cup
Put the catch cup and the shipping cup mouth-to-mouth and coax the spider out of the catch cup into the shipping vessel. If the catch cup is larger than the shipping container I would use a cap with a hole in it to reduce the openings to match. The last thing you want is an angry spider coming loose away from it's enclosure and safety of it's burrow.

Using a zip tie, it's soft plastic and won't harm them. Coax the spider through the holes in the catch cup into the shipping container. She will go. It's a dark, small space which will be "safer" to her than being exposed in the catch cup.

Once she is in the cup, cover the opening with another paper towel, dampen in several spots and seal up the shipping cup. Put a strip of painters tape over the lid, securing the lid. Package for shipping, add ice pack or heat pack as weather dictates and you are good.

I usually don't package till the day of shipping as close to shipping time as possible.

The spider will be secure and comfortable inside the shipping container but we always want to minimize stress and the amount of time in the cocoon - although they are safer in there than you would think. Remember, in nature they will stuff themselves into tight spaces to hide, so this is a natural, and it cushions them from boxes being dropped, thrown or who knows what.

As long as the spider is not in premolt, it will be fine. Don't soak the paper towels and don't ship dry.
Watch the video, think it through, be prepared (measure twice, cut once, so to speak) and once you start there is no turning back lol just get er done.

Sorry for the long post
Let us know how it works out, and please, no bite report; okay thanks

@Enn49 this is great information for people interested in learning how to pack tarantulas. Can we get this stickied somewhere? :)
 

Casey K.

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
I really want that female E. murinus, lol. I'm determined.... hahahaha

I also want to buy your female B. albiceps (seeing as my sling escaped) but I really want you to ship the female E. murinus with it. Also may want the female A. avic (but I'm back and forth on that one). I can send funds immediately via paypal.
 
Last edited:

wdulaney

Active Member
I really want that female E. murinus, lol. I'm determined.... hahahaha

I also want to buy your female B. albiceps (seeing as my sling escaped) but I really want you to ship the female E. murinus with it. Also may want the female A. avic (but I'm back and forth on that one). I can send funds immediately via paypal.
Lol, I still have to test the method, which I will do this week. The Albiceps is currently on hold, but I can let you know if things change.
 

jrh3

Active Member
3 Year Member
Lol, I still have to test the method, which I will do this week. The Albiceps is currently on hold, but I can let you know if things change.
can you get the E. Murinus out Of her burrow? If so there is an easy way to get her into a deli cup with paper towel rolls around it for shipping. Go to auto zone and buy one of those oil funnels, the long ones, cut it off big enough for her to fit through but Still small enough for you to stick into the end of the shipping cups. I can go into detail on making a shipping tube in a deli cup if needed. But once you have the funnel stuck into the funnel stuck into the shipping tube, just coax her out with a long paint brush, once she starts into the funnel she won’t tuen around, its super easy this way. Let me know if I didn’t explain it well enough, i can get into more detail.
 

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