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Parakeets as pet

Discussion in 'Off Topic Chit Chat' started by siuoll, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. siuoll

    siuoll Member

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    They're not really so expensive here in Philippines but the problem is they're cage so can I have some tutorial of making a cheap cage for them cause some of it are not so helpful to me, it cost a lot. And also how to take care of them. Thank you
    Dave Jay likes this.
  2. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    What type of parakeet?
    Cages are easily made, you can buy cage fronts premade that you can fit on a box, or use bird netting. Many of my cages were originally furniture, old cupboards, wardrobes, sets of drawers, anything sturdy enough not to be chewed through easily. If you cover the front with wire netting a door can be made by cutting a hole in the netting and attaching a larger piece of netting over the hole using wire as hinges and as a catch. Alternatively you can cut a hole into the wood and use the cutout as a door. My grandfather would use leather cut from old boots or a belt as hinges and a strap of leather as a catch. A screw is left sitting proud and a small hole in the strap fits over the screw head. It's dark here now or I'd take some pictures of my homemade cages. I used to make proper cages with my grandfather too, drilling holes in a wooden frame and inserting pieces of straight stiff wire as bars , very time consuming though. Another simple cage is too have two large plant saucers and a roll of wire netting. The saucers are top and bottom and the netting is rolled into a tube to fit.
    Putting a front onto an existing piece of old furniture is the easiest and most sturdy imo. The traditional wire birdcages commonly sold are not really very good, birds fear attack from above so a wire top makes them nervous and having all wire sides mean that they can't escape draughts so they get sick from sleeping in a draught, even if the cage is kept inside there are still cold draughts at nighttime. Even in warm climates the nighttime air is cooler than a daytime breeze, it's the difference in temperature that makes them sick.
    I'm sure you can find some diy tips on building cages online, but to me putting wire on the front of an old cupboard is the easiest and the best design for the birds health
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
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  3. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    I had to give up keeping birds about 10 years ago after a life of always having them, so the cages are in disrepair.
    For the most part the fronts are premade fronts, but wire netting or a wire birdcage pulled apart works just as well. 20180426_173813.jpg These are the fronts I'm talking about, you can attach them to any wooden box. 20180426_173731.jpg These are an upright shelf unit and a chest of drawers that used to have 9 drawers and legs . 20180426_173711.jpg
    This was a wall mounted kitchen cupboard with doors. 20180426_173929.jpg
    This last one was a linen cupboard.
    I hope that gives you some ideas, old broken furniture shouldn't be too hard to find. If the door or a drawer is missing or broken people often throw them out.