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My Xenesthis immanis became sluggish and died.

neogold

New Member
Messages
10
Location
Netherlands
Hi all,

I'm in the tarantula hobby for over a year now (NW only, about 15 T's). One of my latest additions was a Xenesthis Immanis (DLS around 8 cm). I only had for a bit more than a month. It ate quite well in the first weeks or so (crickets) and then stopped eating. So, I was actually awaiting a (pre) molt. 2 days ago I saw it in the corner of it's enclosure lying basically on it's side between the cork bark and the corner.
Clearly this was no molt so I removed the cork bark and it remained where it was but was sluggsihly moving - not looking healthy from its movements (have seen molts before).
I decided to wait just in case I was wrong - although the soil (coco fiber with peat, a little vermiculite and sphagnum) was not dry and certainly not wet - made the ground around the T a little more wet.
To make a long story short - the T did not improve. It moved slowly and slumped on the cork bark (placed back in the enclosure ) with legs not (yet) in a death curl but much more bent than normal.
Yesterday I left it to itself but at the end of the day it looked to be in a death curl - although it moved in sloooow motion when touched with a pencil.
This morning it was dead. I looked with the phone camera whether something was clearly amiss. On the whole it actually looked good - shining abdomen, not too fat (imo).
The only thing which looked odd was the stuff around it's mouth (not looking very clean anyway). There appear to stick small straws of something (coco fiber ? something of the T itself? ) out of it's mouth (last 2 pictures).

Anyone who has experience can hopefully comment on this? . I would hate to see more of the T's die (certainly if it can be prevented)
 

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neogold

New Member
Messages
10
Location
Netherlands
Sorry for your loss. It's the rough coco fibers in the substrate.
Hi, thanks for confirming. So, in your opinion is this a one off case of bad luck or is it a real risk for other T's as well? I've listened to a lot of Tom morans podcasts and other reliable sources (T collective) and have never heard of this particular risk. However, i found out the hard way it does happen. What is your experience,/advice. Would it be good to switch to plain cheap dirt, or perhaps only for the somewhat larger enthusiastic eaters? Should I use a sieve to try to prevent this?. Just trying to find out what seems the best approach. Hope you or someone else has some good suggestions how to proceed.
Thanks!
 

Arachnoclown

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1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
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6,381
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The Oregon rain forest
Hi, thanks for confirming. So, in your opinion is this a one off case of bad luck or is it a real risk for other T's as well? I've listened to a lot of Tom morans podcasts and other reliable sources (T collective) and have never heard of this particular risk. However, i found out the hard way it does happen. What is your experience,/advice. Would it be good to switch to plain cheap dirt, or perhaps only for the somewhat larger enthusiastic eaters? Should I use a sieve to try to prevent this?. Just trying to find out what seems the best approach. Hope you or someone else has some good suggestions how to proceed.
Thanks!
I dont think the substrate has anything to do with the passing of your spider.
Your spider probably had a freak internal bleedout probably from the development of its new exoskeleton. Fluid out of the spiders mouth clumped up with the substrate would be my guess. Or it tried to drink from the substrate before passing.
 

neogold

New Member
Messages
10
Location
Netherlands
I dont think the substrate has anything to do with the passing of your spider.
Your spider probably had a freak internal bleedout probably from the development of its new exoskeleton. Fluid out of the spiders mouth clumped up with the substrate would be my guess. Or it tried to drink from the substrate before passing.
Thanks for your answer, I hope that's the case indeed. The only doubt I have is that the fibers seem partly ingested. I could easily lift the T from these fibers and they can not easily be dislodged using some force.
I'll try again soon (and then finally discard the T's body) and let you know..
Thanks a lot
 

neogold

New Member
Messages
10
Location
Netherlands
Thanks for your answer, I hope that's the case indeed. The only doubt I have is that the fibers seem partly ingested. I could easily lift the T from these fibers and they can not easily be dislodged using some force.
I'll try again soon (and then finally discard the T's body) and let you know..
Thanks a lot
Just moistened the black stuff near its mouth.
The fibers came out with a gentle pull after waiting a few minutes.
So, I think your conclusion is indeed the right one.
The black stuff is likely blood mixed with substrate in which the fibers got stuck after it dried up.
Good news in the sense that the other T's are safe and no emergency rehousings need to be done. Bad that it got one of the most interesting T's in the collection
Thanks for your help in this!
 

octanejunkie

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4,163
Sorry for your loss. Truly a freak occurrence as clowny said. Coco foir is not a risk to tarantulas.

Tarantula "blood" is called hemolymph, and it's not black or dark in color; it's more blue/green and can appear as cloudy grey/silver.

A similar thing happened to the fellow on Dark Den, a very plump spider died unexpectedly. He assumed premolt when it stopped eating but then suddenly, dead. Impaction and an internal rupture claimed his beauty. Yours does appear to be in premolt.
 
Last edited:

neogold

New Member
Messages
10
Location
Netherlands
Sorry for your loss. Truly a freak occurrence as clowny said. Coco foir is not a risk to tarantulas.

Tarantula "blood" is called hemolymph, and it's not black or dark in color; it's more blue/green and can appear as cloudy grey/silver.

A similar thing happened to the fellow on Dark Den, a very plump spider died unexpectedly. He assumed premolt when it stopped eating but then suddenly, dead. Impaction and an internal rupture claimed his beauty. Yours does appear to be in premolt.
Glad to have this confirmed once again
Anyway glad that this forum has quick, solid and friendly advice by experienced members
Thanks to you as well
 

Noodlelove

Well-Known Member
Messages
228
Location
California
I dont think the substrate has anything to do with the passing of your spider.
Your spider probably had a freak internal bleedout probably from the development of its new exoskeleton. Fluid out of the spiders mouth clumped up with the substrate would be my guess. Or it tried to drink from the substrate before passing.
Okay I guess I'm missing something. I'm going to have to figure out how to read these boards cuz I thought you just said the coconut fiber was a bad thing.
 

Pcancerides

New Member
3 Year Member
Messages
22
Location
USA
Hi, thanks for confirming. So, in your opinion is this a one off case of bad luck or is it a real risk for other T's as well? I've listened to a lot of Tom morans podcasts and other reliable sources (T collective) and have never heard of this particular risk. However, i found out the hard way it does happen. What is your experience,/advice. Would it be good to switch to plain cheap dirt, or perhaps only for the somewhat larger enthusiastic eaters? Should I use a sieve to try to prevent this?. Just trying to find out what seems the best approach. Hope you or someone else has some good suggestions how to proceed.
Thanks!

More Tarantulas that I purchased died like yours than survived. You did nothing wrong.
 

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