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Keeping it 80 degrees?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Enclosures' started by Turtlynne, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. Turtlynne

    Turtlynne Member

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    hi all - have a small T room where I also keep my b. lateralis enclosures...in order to breed the b.lats I am keeping the room at approx 80 degrees with a small space heater...this does not allow the Ts to experience seasonal temp changes - looking for opinion/experiences/advice re: this situation - Ts in the room x approx 6 months now all seem to be well(but of course it has been winter)...
    Dave Jay likes this.
  2. Arachnoclown

    Arachnoclown Well-Known Member

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    Use a heat pad with a thermostat for your roaches.
    Dustin Amack likes this.
  3. WolfSpider

    WolfSpider Well-Known Member

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    Your Ts will thrive. At 80 F it is a bit warm so, they will eat a bit more, and molt a bit quicker. They will be a bit more active. Watch out for mold at that temp. There is no problem with constant temps for your Ts.
    Enn49 likes this.
  4. Whitelightning777

    Whitelightning777 Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    80 is fine for them. I keep all mine that way.

    Most of them, but not all, are from equatorial regions where the temps are constant all year.

    Space heaters can be dangerous.

    There have been cases of injuries associated with cage heating done wrong harming tarantulas in the past that had happened to quite a few people.

    I have completely solved the problem & I can PM you a link on the details.

    That subject is controversial. I would only point out that I was discussing the subject with a friend of mine who happens to be a Vietnam vet. He advised me that tarantulas existed there and that it wasn't 72 degrees with only 40 humidity in either day or night.


    It suffices to say that the source should never be inside of the cage, underneath the cage or tarantulas or substrate & and heat lamps should be located at least 8" away and only contain a 25 watt bulb or element. A voltage controller switch is mandatory and your need to use a point and shoot thermometer to check every location that a spider can gain access to for hot spots that can cause burns.

    If you use a space heater, I'd advise bolting it up so it can't fall and possibly having sprinklers or a fire extinguisher set up in the room. They kill hundreds of people around the world in fires each year.

    Window mounted heat pumps are by far safer and add less to the power bill.
  5. Dustin Amack

    Dustin Amack Well-Known Member

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    I have 2 large roach colonies in my T room. I use heat mats on their tubs and a radiator heat source with thermostate to regulate temp. 80 seems pretty warm IMO. I usually never go above 75 degrees in my room and keep a constant year-round temp. I was told early on in this hobby that if you are focusing on temps and humidity constantly you arent enjoying the hobby as it's intended. Room temp is totally perfect and humidity is of no concern (for most Ts). Just overflow water dishes once in a while nad enjoy your Ts. :)
    WolfSpider likes this.
  6. Whitelightning777

    Whitelightning777 Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Personally, if be miserable stuck in a room that's 80 degrees. I just save it for the cages.

    Keep in mind that cold temps have their drawbacks and own set of risks.

    First, many feeders especially mealworms are more cold tolerant then tarantulas are. Killing prey is confrontational. Handicapping your spider makes its risk of getting hurt or killed that much worse. If it's a sling and not an adult or the feeder is a bit too big the problem is even worse.

    Second, coordination and speed are reduced with cold and that increases the risk of falls. Tarantulas go for height and light when they're cold. At this point, grip strength is below it's optimum. The risk of say a L klugi chasing a hissing roach up the wall at 80 degrees is fairly slight. Hanging upside down at 68 or 70 for hours at a time just waiting to get spooked and fall should be treated as an emergency.

    It's NOT normal for terrestrial Ts to hang out upside down or be driven literally up the wall. When they're set up right, it's eyes up fangs down. Cold annoys the spider and causes this aberrant behavior. Fatalities have resulted from falls.

    Cold also prevents injuries from healing or limbs growing back as fast as they should. Activity level is reduced to zombified levels especially if the T is used to a warmer set up.

    Remember, OBTs didn't evolve in corporate office buildings. Neither did T blondi.
  7. PanzoN88

    PanzoN88 Well-Known Member

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    For the Dubia roaches, follow the advice already given by @Arachnoclown , as for the tarantulas, they will be fine at 80 degrees. They will also be perfectly fine with a space heater (and even central heating). Heat lamps/mats/cables/etc... are not necessary and very much pointless (though heat mats would be alright for a micro climate). From 9/2014 (when i first started in the hobby-present i still continue to use space heaters (and central heating as well) at mainly 75-80 degrees (75 mostly, though i do not worry about temperatures). So yes the temperatures are fine and the source of heating you are already using is perfectly fine as well.
    Metalman2004 and WolfSpider like this.
  8. Turtlynne

    Turtlynne Member

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    Thnx all so much for replies - I am LOL a little - as usual no real consensus - many varied opinions which I DO NOT find troubling - my Ts seem to be thriving and I think that is part of the beauty of having them(besides the daily inspections - feedings - rehousing etc which are just plain fun,not chores- OOO! getting new ones, especially delivered!) - they are tolerant little critters if given reasonable care ( this does not mean their needs should be cavalierly neglected in any way)...always happy to commune here with other enthusiasts...sad for those who just don't get it! And thank you 'W-lightening for the reminders about chill temps...I do have 3 Ts in my den where temps are cooler (but I'm an 'old' lady and don't do less than 72 myself..) - I try to keep close eye on their behavior.
  9. Metalman2004

    Metalman2004 Well-Known Member

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    Here in Texas in the summer some rooms get to 80 even when the thermostat is quite a bit lower. One of those rooms happens to be my T room. They are definitely more active (and more interesting to watch) when it is warmer.

    Its not super hot out yet but its already started this year. The T room is a bit warmer than it was and everyone was out walking around today.
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