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is this a normal resting stance for a pink toe?

bemo

New Member
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7
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usa
reading up i read that its "stressed" if the spider is curled up "hiding" she (my t) has this stance all the time.. she goes tighter if i am in there cleaning poop or bump her when i am maintaining her cage. so i assume that it is normal... posted in another forum and they just talked about how my aquarium wasn't right and didnt answer the question. (also got her a proper one with front vents today) the second pic is her old aquarium.. the 3rd pic (with tape measurer) is her when she is balled up tight tight (clearly stressed) the 4th is her new aquarium. had her in the old one for 3 weeks and only had her for 3 as well.. just wanna make sure she isnt stressed (assuming she)
 

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octanejunkie

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It's a large enclosure for a spider that size, and also somewhere barren, bereft of hides; however is that stance uncommon, no

PXL_20210801_033920954.MP.jpg


Check this thread
 

octanejunkie

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it was the smallest one they had. i wanted to keep her in the one i had but every one was on about cross draft
PXL_20210801_035149460.MP.jpg

That's a 32 oz deli cup housing a 2-3" male Avicularia metallica (Avicularia avicularia morphotype 6)
PXL_20210801_040402429.MP.jpg

Above is an inverted, DIY 32oz deli cup with a 4" female Avicularia avicularia (morphotype 1) and she's in premolt. She will be upgraded to a larger enclosure on her next molt.

Get creative and don't be bound by the limitations of the LPS and what they want to sell you. Smaller is sometimes better.
 

bemo

New Member
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7
Location
usa
i also figured she will grow into it..... and the other forum they made it seem the cage was making her stressed so i got anxiety and yeah...... i should have waited but i guess its done. no idea the age or how many molts. i dont think she ate in a few days but a cricket went missing about a day or 2 ago but i didnt see the ball of... cricket husk but no way it got out. she also hates the tongs so. mine may be ready for molt because yesterday the cricket was right IN her fangs and she did the threat pose and flung it in the water dish so idk, all i know is i feel like she is stressed and its stressing me out
 

octanejunkie

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It doesn't seem like you're asking for advice so I won't directly give it, although I've done so indirectly already. You see how others keep a spider that size and part of the reason for a smaller enclosure is so food items don't go hiding; like behind the foam background.

Also, since this is your first post/thread, why don't you post introduce yourself in the Introductions section?

Best of luck, sir/ma'am
 

bemo

New Member
Messages
7
Location
usa
It doesn't seem like you're asking for advice so I won't directly give it, although I've done so indirectly already. You see how others keep a spider that size and part of the reason for a smaller enclosure is so food items don't go hiding; like behind the foam background.

Also, since this is your first post/thread, why don't you post introduce yourself in the Introductions section?

Best of luck, sir/ma'a

It doesn't seem like you're asking for advice so I won't directly give it, although I've done so indirectly already. You see how others keep a spider that size and part of the reason for a smaller enclosure is so food items don't go hiding; like behind the foam background.

Also, since this is your first post/thread, why don't you post introduce yourself in the Introductions section?

Best of luck, sir/ma'am
I am i guess. I mean as long as you don't think she will die with that setup and I am not to sure how forums work this is my first time ever posting on one. No clue how to navigate them lol. Took me way to long to find out how to post.
 

Vermis

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posted in another forum and they just talked about how my aquarium wasn't right

Huh. I can imagine. Their preferred method to help newbies is to scream at them instead of patiently explaining why LPSs aren't a font of knowledge.

Octanejunkie is right, though. Tarantulas will feel less secure and will find it harder to locate prey items in a container that's too large. And on that note, you generally don't want crickets or other live prey insects getting lost in a big space and having the run of the place. It could turn out bad if they pop up again when the spider's moulting and defenceless, and decide to have a chew on it.
Tarantulas aren't dogs that need taken for walks, or african savanna animals that need large zoo enclosures. The general life of a tarantula involves sitting in the same hole in the ground or in a tree until something tasty wanders past. (Apart from mature males, who wander to find a female, but that's getting ahead of things) They don't often need huge spaces to thrive, which is one of their advantages in keeping. Looking at your fourth photo at the top, you could reduce that space to a third and it would still be pretty roomy.

Also agreed with Octanejunkie that you don't have to be limited to what kind of vivariums and containers that pet stores sell. When I think about getting a new invert, the first place I look is at the kitchen storage shelves of supermarkets and pound shops. I haven't kept a spider in a container actually designed for live animals, for long years. I've used everything from little disposable deli pots for spiderlings, to cereal containers and shoeboxes for adults.
The Exo-Terra terrarium looks cool, I understand that. My own eyes have paused on it many times before. You want it to look like you've transplanted a section of the rainforest into your home so the spider can be happy, live naturally, and feel at home. The thing is, the look of the thing is more for the benefit of human viewers than for the animal, especially when the smallest version is still too huge for many spiders. I wouldn't say get rid of it, but I think something has to give. My first instinct would be to set up a smaller container for the spider, and place that inside the Exo-Terra.

The emphasis on cross ventilation is because it allows for more efficient air exchange. Prevents the air and substrate inside from becoming too stagnant or humid, discourages the proliferation of mould and pests, which can especially be a problem for avics, I understand.

I've glanced at exo-terras but I'm not too familiar with them. Is that a UV light at the top? LED? Is that included with the terrarium or something you added? Either way, if you're asking for ways to de-stress your tarantula, I'd say switching that off might be a good start! And again, yeah, add more potential hides.
 

bemo

New Member
Messages
7
Location
usa
Huh. I can imagine. Their preferred method to help newbies is to scream at them instead of patiently explaining why LPSs aren't a font of knowledge.

Octanejunkie is right, though. Tarantulas will feel less secure and will find it harder to locate prey items in a container that's too large. And on that note, you generally don't want crickets or other live prey insects getting lost in a big space and having the run of the place. It could turn out bad if they pop up again when the spider's moulting and defenceless, and decide to have a chew on it.
Tarantulas aren't dogs that need taken for walks, or african savanna animals that need large zoo enclosures. The general life of a tarantula involves sitting in the same hole in the ground or in a tree until something tasty wanders past. (Apart from mature males, who wander to find a female, but that's getting ahead of things) They don't often need huge spaces to thrive, which is one of their advantages in keeping. Looking at your fourth photo at the top, you could reduce that space to a third and it would still be pretty roomy.

Also agreed with Octanejunkie that you don't have to be limited to what kind of vivariums and containers that pet stores sell. When I think about getting a new invert, the first place I look is at the kitchen storage shelves of supermarkets and pound shops. I haven't kept a spider in a container actually designed for live animals, for long years. I've used everything from little disposable deli pots for spiderlings, to cereal containers and shoeboxes for adults.
The Exo-Terra terrarium looks cool, I understand that. My own eyes have paused on it many times before. You want it to look like you've transplanted a section of the rainforest into your home so the spider can be happy, live naturally, and feel at home. The thing is, the look of the thing is more for the benefit of human viewers than for the animal, especially when the smallest version is still too huge for many spiders. I wouldn't say get rid of it, but I think something has to give. My first instinct would be to set up a smaller container for the spider, and place that inside the Exo-Terra.

The emphasis on cross ventilation is because it allows for more efficient air exchange. Prevents the air and substrate inside from becoming too stagnant or humid, discourages the proliferation of mould and pests, which can especially be a problem for avics, I understand.

I've glanced at exo-terras but I'm not too familiar with them. Is that a UV light at the top? LED? Is that included with the terrarium or something you added? Either way, if you're asking for ways to de-stress your tarantula, I'd say switching that off might be a good start! And again, yeah, add more potential hides.
it is indeed a led light. i have 20% window tint on it, (i took the film off for the pic and retinted it after) i see a bald spot on her so she is ready for a molt so i am not going to do anything till after the molt. and she was rejecting food a few days ago. i was thinking of putting plexy glass in there to limit the space. and i only put 1 cricket at a time when i do feed and if she does not see it in a few days i take it out and put a new one in (so it explore and will run into her) when and if she nests that will be easy just drop one in her hole
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Messages
973
Location
Preston,UK
the pic makes it look alot brighter than it is
Hi there
Avicularia sp( Caribena Versicolor is ex Avicularia) will gravitate towards the top almoast all the time.Try to put your cover up high minimising the clutter on substrate level as it will only provide hiding spots for the feeders.Also they really appreciate larger leaf fake plants as cover and higher cork bark that give them stable foot hold.
You don't need so much substrate in as they don't make use of it.

Regards Konstantin
 

bemo

New Member
Messages
7
Location
usa
Hi there
Avicularia sp( Caribena Versicolor is ex Avicularia) will gravitate towards the top almoast all the time.Try to put your cover up high minimising the clutter on substrate level as it will only provide hiding spots for the feeders.Also they really appreciate larger leaf fake plants as cover and higher cork bark that give them stable foot hold.
You don't need so much substrate in as they don't make use of it.

Regards Konstantin
been looking around for other plants to hang. been to alot of pet stores with nothing like what i want. that also was the biggest cork log i could find
 
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