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I really don’t know what to do anymore…..

Dyron.s

Member
Messages
50
Location
Lelystad
Dear fellow tarantula keepers. As some of you may or may not know, i’ve posted a couple of treads lately concerning my b.boehmei’s extensive climbing behaviour.
Her old terrarium had a mesh cover so i bought her a new one a month ago. She continued to climb and fall all over again. When i came home last night i noticed that her rear leg was bended and not shaped naturally. I read that this is not something to worry about too much because it will fix itself on the next molt but…. She keeps on climbing and falling and i am affraid she is only going to injure herself more… what can i do?
 

Casey K.

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Messages
4,728
I agree with Kymura. A terrestrial tarantula doesn't need as much height as the do floor space. Leave about 5" from the ceiling of the enclosure to the floor (substrate). That should be plenty of room and that way if the tarantula does climb a little there's not that much room for it to fall and get hurt. Offer it a hide, as well.
 

Dyron.s

Member
Messages
50
Location
Lelystad
Please add a picture of the enclosure and describe the "furniture " you have in it

This is the current setup, i’ve had her in this setup for about 1 year now and she uses the fake tree stump as a hide. The height between the substrate and the top of the terrarium is Max 2x her dls
0C0AAE2D-4229-44A3-BD68-548EEBD2F3FC.jpeg
 

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Blackdog

Member
Messages
36
Location
Richmond
I would consider adding moss to increase the height of the substrate in the front. Also maybe add black foam sheets to the backs and sides to give a more closed in feel for the T. Mine only has 1 times the height and love lounging with one leg touching the lid. Hope the leg corrects on the next molt!
 

Dyron.s

Member
Messages
50
Location
Lelystad
I would consider adding moss to increase the height of the substrate in the front. Also maybe add black foam sheets to the backs and sides to give a more closed in feel for the T. Mine only has 1 times the height and love lounging with one leg touching the lid. Hope the leg corrects on the next molt!
Allright i will definitely do that!
 

Dyron.s

Member
Messages
50
Location
Lelystad
Please let us know how things are going.
Currently things are going worse than before. The leg is bleeding more and she just won’t stop climbing and falling. I tried to rehouse her into a smaller enclosure for the time being so she couldn’t injure herself any further but when i try, she becomes really defensive and flees to her hide
 

Dyron.s

Member
Messages
50
Location
Lelystad
Please let us know how things are going.
P.s I am considering putting her back in her old enclosure. It is a bit smaller but has a mesh lid. I read that if you tape the edges of the mesh it discourages the t to climb on the ceiling is that correct? And if so, what kind of tape is best for the job?
Last question. Do I need to treat the leg or just let it be?
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
Messages
812
Location
Preston,UK
Hi
You should consider moving the spider in something with less height to make sure the spider can't injure itself in case of a fall.Something with height 1 to 1.5 DLS of your tarantula maximum between the top and the substrate. Deeper enclosure can be used if you can fill it with more dirt without compromising the ventilation.
There is nothing you can do in regards of the climbing behaviour of your spider.It may be because it doesn't like the consistency of the substrate (maybe too fluffy and not packed down well) , maybe too wet ,maybe not settled in the new enclosure or even just your spider is doing weird things and being pain in the backside as they do.
I have some spiders going trough phases like that.
Get appropriate enclosure sorted and let your spider do its thing in peace.
At the end of the day they all do as they please
Regards Konstantin
 

Dyron.s

Member
Messages
50
Location
Lelystad
Hi
You should consider moving the spider in something with less height to make sure the spider can't injure itself in case of a fall.Something with height 1 to 1.5 DLS of your tarantula maximum between the top and the substrate. Deeper enclosure can be used if you can fill it with more dirt without compromising the ventilation.
There is nothing you can do in regards of the climbing behaviour of your spider.It may be because it doesn't like the consistency of the substrate (maybe too fluffy and not packed down well) , maybe too wet ,maybe not settled in the new enclosure or even just your spider is doing weird things and being pain in the backside as they do.
I have some spiders going trough phases like that.
Get appropriate enclosure sorted and let your spider do its thing in peace.
At the end of the day they all do as they please
Regards Konstantin
Thank you very much for the given advice, I moved her into a smaller enclosure about an hour ago
PS.
Don't bother putting tape and such to try to stop your spider being a spider. You can do more harm than good to your pet.
the reason I was concidering tape is because the top is made of metal mesh. I know that T’s can get stuck in them and heard that if you tape of the entry points the won’t find any grip and therefore discourages them to climb up the ceiling
 

MBullock

Well-Known Member
Messages
451
Location
Arizona
IMO the spider is suffocating and trying to escape from a pool of Co2.

The spider alone doesnt generate enougn Co2 to suffocate, but every time you loom over and exhale into that tank you're flooding it with Co2
You need cross ventilation, not top ventilation. Co2 is denser than air so it sinks.
 

MBullock

Well-Known Member
Messages
451
Location
Arizona
and also, the cross ventilation must be as close to the substrate surface as possible. that way the Co2 leaks out instead of sinking into the burrow(s)
 

MBullock

Well-Known Member
Messages
451
Location
Arizona
Have you or landscapers been using or around ornamental plants or gardens?
the only two things other than Co2 poisoning i can think of are an insecticide called "Spinosad" which causes incessant wandering, or nematode infection. Look between the fangs for a gross cheese-like glob. If present, it confirms nematodes.
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
Messages
812
Location
Preston,UK
Thank you very much for the given advice, I moved her into a smaller enclosure about an hour ago

the reason I was concidering tape is because the top is made of metal mesh. I know that T’s can get stuck in them and heard that if you tape of the entry points the won’t find any grip and therefore discourages them to climb up the ceiling
Hi
the mesh lid is only an issue if the height is more than the spider DLS they can't get stuck if they can reach the top and the substrate at all times if they stretch. Coco fiber and moss is ok for substrate as long as is packed down really well.Some tarantulas don’t like fluffy substrate while some don’t care.
Also tarantulas have decent grip even on glass so won't having good grip with tape sounds unrealistic and not worth the risk in case they get tangled in the tape.
How large is your spider btw?
Regards Konstantin
 
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