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I have no T's.

Poor Pauly

New Member
Hello,

I have always been interested in keeping T's, now is the time to start. Currently I do not own a T but doing my research. Been at it for just over a month now, getting all the information out there and learning what is good advise and what is bad advise. Getting it narrowed down to who knows their stuff and who are the fake experts.

I am curious as to how many of you got so called 'starter tarantula's' for beginners and who jumped in with going with their favorite species regardless of ease of care? Since local stores are not much of a choice I will be making my first order online and will start with around 5 to 10 slings/juvies from a single online source. Current availability has me looking at Caribena versicolor, Chromatapelma cyaneopubescens, and Brachypelma Smithi.
 

Casey K.

Well-Known Member
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I feel as long as you do your research on any specific species then you may start off with any T you want. Starting off with a nw is always best, though, as caring for it may help or contribute to knowledge prior to obtaining an ow species. I started off with nw terrestrials (rose hairs) but I know some who bought their first tarantula from the Poecilotheria genus. :)
 

Poor Pauly

New Member
Trust me. You'll get one T. Then another, and another, and then...Before you know it, you'll realize that one more is never enough. :)

After dumping thousands of dollars in the aquarium hobby and African cichlids, I am prepared that I may end up with dozens of T's. My intent in the fish hobby was to eventually breed, I suspect the same will happen with this hobby. Nature and critters have always been part of my life.
 

Revant

New Member
Started the same way. Began with Convict Cichlids, ended up with Caribena Versiculors. I am not regretting the change.

If you're in the mind of breeding Ts, keep in mind to take into account ease of breeding for your starters as well. Some T's are easy breezy breeders. Others like L. ******imum need unique circumstances (in this particular case, dry spell and then flooding to simulate rain) to induce successful egg laying.
 

Enn49

Moderator
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I admit to being one of those who jumped in at the deep end by getting an OBT as my first T followed a few months later a Poecilotheria metallica.
My view is that as long as you do your research and know exactly what the T is capable of, invest in long tongs for maintenance and always move slowly near them you'll be fine. Buy the Ts you really want, not what you're told is suitable.
 

Casey K.

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
I admit to being one of those who jumped in at the deep end by getting an OBT as my first T followed a few months later a Poecilotheria metallica.
My view is that as long as you do your research and know exactly what the T is capable of, invest in long tongs for maintenance and always move slowly near them you'll be fine. Buy the Ts you really want, not what you're told is suitable.


I feel the same way. Besides, it's not like we are children here wanting to invest in a bunch of ow tarantulas. We are adults and old enough to know what we can/can't handle. Research is key. :)
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
Tarantula Club Member
My first T was a new world. It was an adult Phormictopus cancerides. (Haitian Brown.) A species that is large, fast & allegedly defensive. I did not do an awful lot of research about different species, or how to care for my T. Or not until I spotted him for sale locally online. Then I looked at various sources for what his care needs were & learned as I went along. He came in a totally inappropriate enclosure (arboreal.) And had lived like that for several years & despite his previous owner, apparently, knowing less than I did. He had survived, so don't let being a novice put you off. Some people can keep a T for years & know b---r all.

Do the best you can for your T. Try to keep learning & as long as you can remain calm around a fast & potentially defensive T. Then go for what you want. As personally I would say the main reason some T's are not seen as beginner friendly, is because as a keeper you need to be confident & slowish & not panic if or when they bolt, or need rehoming etc.
 

NorseDad

Active Member
I was very influenced to go for a "beginner" species when I started out. I picked the beginner T I liked the most. If I'm honest, I probably wouldn't approach it the same way if I could go back in time. I don't personally feel that buying a species you may not be thrilled about just so you can gain experience is the best option. Research the species you like, decide if you feel you can handle the T you are interested in, and buy it. You will put more effort into the species you truly want than you will a stepping stone. I also find myself being more careful and attentive with my more defensive/speedy Ts than I am with my slow NW species.

If you happen to want an OW more than anything else, I recommend at least buying a sling so you can grow with it. That way you aren't throwing yourself in the ring with a 5" OBT, for example, right from the start. My second T was a C. marshalli (OW), and I bought it just a month after my beginner species.

I also recommend a back up plan if it turns out you cannot keep a fast/defensive T. Find someone who would be willing to take it if you can't care for it.

Just my 2 cents.
 

Gizalba

Active Member
I got my first T around 3 and a half months ago - she is a 'beginner' one, a Tlitocatl Albopilosus (curly hair). However at the beginning, and even now, it seems I want a range of tarantulas regardless of whether they are 'beginner' or not. I fell in love with the curly hair fluffyness :p but this one just happening to be beginner too, did sway my decision. I have still got my eye on some of the really colourful Brachypelmas.

Since then I seem to have 'moved on' in orderly but swift steps ;) I saved the avicularia for a few Ts down the line just because their humidity plus good ventilation balance sounded a bit more complicated, although I have 3 of them now (well all 3 are at least 'ex' avicularia) - they are awesome :) Mine at least seem to move around more than the others and go for walks whilst appearing less shy. I also really like how they act aboreal straight from being a small spiderling, being right at the top of 'trees' in the enclosure.

From there I moved onto Psalmopoeus, as I wanted more different types of aboreal but am not ready for the potency and speed of pokies.

I also bear in mind the 'hair flickyness/irritation potential' of the species, as some I have read to be beginner - friendly (like Lasiodora species) seem to cause havoc with hairs, which for me personally with sensitive skin already, is not good.

I have also stayed away so far from 'swamp dwellers', as I can imagine getting the balance between extreme humidity whilst preventing mould and mites is hard.
 
I started with beginner and intermediate at the same time.

If you want to start out with a more defensive ow, besides research you also need to know how you would react if it bolted out onto you. If you would be afraid for this to happen, you would flick it off and kill it. If you know you would react calmly, i bet you could pull it off. Always expect the unexpected so that if the unexpected did happen, your t would be ok.
 

Poor Pauly

New Member
also need to know how you would react if it bolted out onto you.

This is what draws me to husbandry of all types. I like to get to know my critters and their habits and personalities. Who knew fish have personalities until you get to know one.

I have always had a natural anility to learning and reading animals 'body language'. This is what draws me to the T hobby. Some people see them as pet rocks or pet holes. I see a living thing just wanting to be comfortable and thriving.

Watching Darkko of DarkDen or Tom Moran interact with their collection on YT and seeing the behaviors is what really got me hooked into getting into this hobby. That and the DIY nature of housing setups.

Still getting prepped, soon, very soon.
 

Eadaein

New Member
After dumping thousands of dollars in the aquarium hobby and African cichlids, I am prepared that I may end up with dozens of T's. My intent in the fish hobby was to eventually breed, I suspect the same will happen with this hobby. Nature and critters have always been part of my life.
Oh no! I feel you, I have thousands into my 20+ tanks of Killies, Bettas, shrimp and other goodies. We're in trouble! I've already spent a lot on creating my T an upgraded bioactive tank and it's not even finished! Can't see what you set up, and your choices!
Haha
Good luck with your first Ts!
 

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