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How often you feed a sling?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Feeding and Feeder Insects' started by pavlos, Sep 5, 2015.

  1. pavlos

    pavlos New Member

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    I have a brazilian black sling and i feed it small mealworms 1 per week. SHould i feed it more?
    I don't want it to have problems with molt or something.
    Thanks
  2. Kiiarah

    Kiiarah New Member

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    I have an A. chalcodes sling (about 1.75'') that I am currently working with and was advised by other keepers that it is alright to feed them a bit more than you would feed adults. Not a ton, just slightly more frequent feedings. What is your reason for looking into feeding more, does it look underweight or is there another reason to be concerned? Photos would probably help a great deal in offering feeding advice as many on here would likely recognize a healthy vs underweight T. I wouldn't say go ahead and up feedings just yet as I am unsure about the issues with moulting and since that advice was based specifically on the T I am dealing with and his/her size. Got any good pics we could take a look at? :)

    On a side note, those are a gorgeous species, definitely on my "want list". Gonna be gorgeous when it reaches full size. ^_^
  3. pavlos

    pavlos New Member

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    Naah He is fine i believe, but people say that you should feed slings more, others say don't feed them too much because they will have problems when they moult. So ill probably go for 1 mealworm (size of his body) every 4 days instead of 7.
    Here are some pics bro, and thanks for the tips and reply :)
    The darker one is 5 days later taken from the other one.
    Let me know man

    Attached Files:

  4. Kiiarah

    Kiiarah New Member

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    I would wait for some more keepers to offer their take on the schedule before increasing his feedings. To me he looks healthy, but I am still very new to this. I agree though that it is possible (and unhealthy) to overfeed so you really don't want to increase intake unless there is a health reason for doing so. The one my husband and I found was very obviously not doing well, so that is one reason for the increased feedings for mine, but I still plan for it to be short term. Do you happen to know how old your little one is?
  5. Chubbs

    Chubbs Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    It's a second instar I believe. It's pretty much impossible to tell how many weeks/ months/years a tarantula is unless you're the one who hatched the sac.

    As for feeding, at that size you can feed it until it refuses to eat anymore.
  6. Therasoid

    Therasoid Well-Known Member

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    Twice weekly, Tuesday and Saturday, in the wee hours. Only 1 prey item per feeding. Prey size and type are dependent on the species and its size. Species under 1/2" are fed pre killed prey. They will scavage. Always remove uneaten prey the following (24hr) day, failing to do so invites unwanted pests and molds.
    Never experienced or heard of a sling dying from eating too much. They're hard wired to eat and molt frequently to get out of this delicate stage of growth quickly.
    Always have a water dish of some type in the enclosure.
    This is my schedule on sling feeding.
    Kymura likes this.
  7. Kiiarah

    Kiiarah New Member

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    I am just curious, until what size are they still considered a sling? Is it safe to feed say a 2'' tarantula as much as it will eat?
  8. Chubbs

    Chubbs Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    2 inches is pretty much a juvenile. It's not unsafe to feed them that often once they get bigger, it's just not really necessary as much IMO.
  9. pavlos

    pavlos New Member

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    Thanks everyone for your helpful advices. My sling now sealed it's den so i guess pre molt just started :)
  10. Kiiarah

    Kiiarah New Member

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    Thanks for the clarification Chubbs. I guess that means my little one is probably one moult away from the juvenile stage, which is sort of a relief. Have you ever heard of any health issues or moulting issues associated with "power feeding"? I know it can shorten their life span, so should not be a long term method, but are there any possible risks in the short term, say a couple of months or until they get a bit larger?
  11. Kiiarah

    Kiiarah New Member

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    Good luck with the moult Pavlos! Keep us posted on her progress. ^_^
  12. pavlos

    pavlos New Member

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    i will :)
    Although it could take even 3 months maybe more at maximum, (from the research i've done).
    So yeah thanks :D
  13. Chubbs

    Chubbs Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Well there is always that possibility of a tarantula with a large abdomen falling and hurting itself, but that tends to happen more with terrestrial and even then people don't really worry too much about it.
  14. RedCapTrio

    RedCapTrio Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I am wondering on this same topic. I am quite excited since my T just molted and it will be feeding time soon!
  15. Ratmosphere

    Ratmosphere Active Member

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    I was wondering the same thing as well. I fed my sling twice last week and this week it's showing no interest in feeding. The T usually roams around to look for food. Instead, the spider has been hanging out on the web it built.
  16. Chubbs

    Chubbs Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    What species again? I haven't really been keeping up with this thread lately Has it molted yet in your care? If not, the excess webbing leads me to believe it's probably about to.
  17. Ratmosphere

    Ratmosphere Active Member

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    Avicularia versicolor. It hasn't molted yet in my care. Today I tried to drop a cricket in and the T is showing no interest in feeding. Any tips on getting the cricket out without damaging the webbing?
  18. Chubbs

    Chubbs Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Just take the cricket out, the spider will reweb.
  19. Ratmosphere

    Ratmosphere Active Member

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    Just took it out using tongs. Minimal damage was done to the web.
  20. RedCapTrio

    RedCapTrio Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I guess you'll start to see a pattern or signs when your T is still interested to feed and when it is in premolt. When my B, smithi is hanging at the entrance of its cave, then it always attacked the food dropped in front of it. When it is hiding, then I don't give it anything and leave it alone. Works also with my G. pulchripes.

    :D
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