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Hide coconut shell

Gurat

New Member
Hi guys, I'm new here, and this is my first post. So about a week ago I bought my first Chaco golden knee, and made her this setup. But I noticed her, she is not using her hide at all, to be honest, I never found it inside. Her hide is a coconut shell. She stays in the top corner of the terrarium. You think this is normal? Thanks
 

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Gurat

New Member
Your setup looks good, but it might need a little more substrate so it can burrow in the hide if it likes. My rose hair went in the corner all the time too just give it a few days and it will start to explore. It is just adjusting to its new home is all :D.
Ok then, I will add more substrate to it, and cook it a bit to dry it up, cause last time I left it a bit moist, and mold started to show up. Thanks for your advise
 

Tnoob

Well-Known Member
I've heard this behavior is normal for this species. Fear now tarantulas says this much about them. They are supposedly a great display species.
 

Gurat

New Member
And just a small question. If my T is on top of my enclosure, like the pic I posted, if I throw a cricket as a food for my T, does she see it?
 

menavodi

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
:DYes, spiders see movement very good. They have kind of a 360° view. 8 eyes miss nothing. Not even at night time! :T:
 

Gurat

New Member
:DYes, spiders see movement very good. They have kind of a 360° view. 8 eyes miss nothing. Not even at night time! :T:
So there is no need to put the spider down back on the substrate? Cause sometimes when i give her a cricket, she doesn't move from where she is, and then i put her on the ground, and when the cricket passes her several times, finally she will attack him, but before the attack, the cricket will even get under my T, and she won't do nothing to it, but as I said, when he passes several times, finally she will attack him. I usually give her a cricket every 3 days, you think it's good, or more then enough?
 

menavodi

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
I personal feed once a week. Depends on the size how much crickets I put in. I feed about 5 to 8 a week. Many spiders “collect” 4 or more crickets when they are hungry.
 

Gurat

New Member
My cricket size is medium size, approximately 1cm. But I think if she will be hungry, she will get on the ground as soon as i give her a cricket, and she won't let him go underneath her right?
 

MrKrowe

Well-Known Member
Coming to this a bit late, apologies. As @Arachnoclown said, you need to compact the substrate and let it dry out. Grammostola pulchripes, which I assume we are talking about here, lives in arid areas so it likes it dry. Your spider will not accept food while it feels uncomfortable. These spiders live most of their lives in a burrow waiting for food to walk by so they don’t eat very often. Once you have dried out and compacted the substrate in her enclosure try leaving her for a couple of weeks while she settles in, she won’t starve but you should make sure she has access to a water dish. You will know she is settled when she has laid down some web.
 

Gurat

New Member
Coming to this a bit late, apologies. As @Arachnoclown said, you need to compact the substrate and let it dry out. Grammostola pulchripes, which I assume we are talking about here, lives in arid areas so it likes it dry. Your spider will not accept food while it feels uncomfortable. These spiders live most of their lives in a burrow waiting for food to walk by so they don’t eat very often. Once you have dried out and compacted the substrate in her enclosure try leaving her for a couple of weeks while she settles in, she won’t starve but you should make sure she has access to a water dish. You will know she is settled when she has laid down some web.
I have putted the substrate in the oven, just to dry it out. In the night, or early morning, u usually find her walking down on the substrate, but during the day, always in the top corner left/right of the enclosure
 

Gurat

New Member
Coming to this a bit late, apologies. As @Arachnoclown said, you need to compact the substrate and let it dry out. Grammostola pulchripes, which I assume we are talking about here, lives in arid areas so it likes it dry. Your spider will not accept food while it feels uncomfortable. These spiders live most of their lives in a burrow waiting for food to walk by so they don’t eat very often. Once you have dried out and compacted the substrate in her enclosure try leaving her for a couple of weeks while she settles in, she won’t starve but you should make sure she has access to a water dish. You will know she is settled when she has laid down some web.
Hi, just to ask again, she made some webs in the corner where she likes to stay mostly, and I haven't gave her food for 15 days now, and yesterdqy and today morning I gave her a cricket, but she still refused it, even when the cricket almost touched her, she still ignored it. Do you know what is the reason please? Thanks in advance
 

MrKrowe

Well-Known Member
Hi, just to ask again, she made some webs in the corner where she likes to stay mostly, and I haven't gave her food for 15 days now, and yesterdqy and today morning I gave her a cricket, but she still refused it, even when the cricket almost touched her, she still ignored it. Do you know what is the reason please? Thanks in advance
Spiders will stop eating when they are approaching a moult, they will also lay down a web carpet to moult on. It’s possible your spider is preparing to moult. Leave her for another week or so before offering food again. If she refuses it again don’t worry, this can go on for quite some time.
 

Gurat

New Member
Spiders will stop eating when they are approaching a moult, they will also lay down a web carpet to moult on. It’s possible your spider is preparing to moult. Leave her for another week or so before offering food again. If she refuses it again don’t worry, this can go on for quite some time.
Yes, she had moulted couple of days ago (last Monday). I was thinking of try to give her another cricket maybe on saturday, or do you think i should leave her for a week? I was just getting a bit worried, because next Sunday it will be 4 weeks for her without food, first 2 weeks I didn't gave her so she will get used to her enclosure, and 3rd week is for pre-moulting, and obviously I don't want her to starve. Sorry for all these questions guys, but this is my first T, and I didn't knew anything about them, I just need an expert opinion . Thanks a lot for helping me everytime I asked a question
 

MrKrowe

Well-Known Member
Yes, she had moulted couple of days ago (last Monday). I was thinking of try to give her another cricket maybe on saturday, or do you think i should leave her for a week? I was just getting a bit worried, because next Sunday it will be 4 weeks for her without food, first 2 weeks I didn't gave her so she will get used to her enclosure, and 3rd week is for pre-moulting, and obviously I don't want her to starve. Sorry for all these questions guys, but this is my first T, and I didn't knew anything about them, I just need an expert opinion . Thanks a lot for helping me everytime I asked a question
Going without food for four weeks is not a problem, they can go much longer. Make sure she has access to fresh water and she will be fine. For a spider that size I would wait at least a week before offering food.

Glad she's moulted for you without any problems. Now enjoy the fresh colours.
 

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