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Heteroscodra maculata advise

Hey there

On Saturday i became the proud owner of a young Heteroscodra maculata ( Togo Starburst Baboon)

Is there any specific and special advise needed for this spider.
From the care-sheets i can see that this T can be a hardy spider, as it is Semi - Arboreal, Can be very defensive/variable.

I need some tips and advise on how to make this T a happy one.
I have already provided a very interesting terrarium with plenty hiding places and a twig to climb.

Another interesting fact i read was that it Venom Potency is Powerful (Swelling from venom, will subside within 12 hours. Minor pain for 24-48 hours)
 
Thanks Adam.

Well she is still a baby T, so the enclosure isn't that big. I've provided enough places for her to hide. if only she can grow fast enough so that I can place her into a bigger enclosure so I can add a tree stump.

anyone ever been bitten by a Heteroscodra maculata and if so was it painfull and can it be dangerous
 

Martin Oosthuysen

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Hello
Lasiodora specimens are new world or Americas,anything new world has low venom potency and rely on urticating hairs rather than the bite. Anything from Africa,Asia etc rely on venom and don't have the hairs to protect themselves.
 
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Martin Oosthuysen

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http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?11996-Heteroscodra-maculata

Here's some bite reports. Considered to have one of the nastier venom's in the hobby.

Beautiful T's tho, can't wait till my sling gets bigger :)
Hello
Heteroscodra Maculata is rated second only to Stromatopelma Calceatum, well that's general consensus. I would suggest to look at tests done on P.regalis/Ornata and Lampropelma genus as well,its found if you look for it on the web. The Lampropelma Sp. Borneo black had effects lasting for several days(venom potency was also tested on live animals),same as the Stromatopelma Calceatum.Why I believe the tests since its a controlled environment and when they look at reports they are usually strict about it. People usually don't factor in outside impacts when looking at bites from Tarantulas,like say secondary infection etc they just attribute their symptoms to the T's venom. People forget a tarantulas fangs are natural epidermic needles,as in medical ones they get contaminated with all sorts of nasties. Also factor in that what they eat or come in contact with,could cause different reactions and not the poor tarantulas venom. Just look at what the body does when it realises it has foreign things in the bloodstream which triggers the natural defense system,nausea vomiting etc thus the body could just be reacting and its seen as effects from the venom.
 
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Martin Oosthuysen

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Chromatopelma Cyaneopubescens is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful new world terrestrials,not aggressive or defensive in my opinion and have a huge appetite. They are hardy since they live in desert surroundings, so you have a stunning yet hardy tarantula.
 
Chromatopelma Cyaneopubescens is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful new world terrestrials,not aggressive or defensive in my opinion and have a huge appetite. They are hardy since they live in desert surroundings, so you have a stunning yet hardy tarantula.
And what an amazing spider she is, with a huge appetite. she will eat 4 crickets a day if she had the chance, this one time she ate 2 crickets at once.
 

Martin Oosthuysen

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You need to read more bite reports.
The problem with bite reports are as follows
- not all are on the exact same place
- the specimens size
- the fang length which ties into the previous one
- Was it just a dry bite
- was there clothing where the bite had to penetrate

These factors determine the severity,since that why some experience less symptoms and assume the bite is less potent than stated or think they are less affected. If the specimen is large or small,venom potency is the same. The difference comes in how deep did he penetrate and where. I have seen where people have stated its not so bad,the reason is it didn't hit the target 100% or go through the needed skin layers or had clothing blocking it somewhat.

Heteroscodra Stromatopelma lampropelma Haplopelma Poecilotheria Chilobrachys and others,will if the situation plays out right no matter the size of specimen put you in a world of pain. True reports have stated like Haplopelma Hainanum which has and is documented as the most potent venom due to the highest peptide count,just a scratch not a bite caused very uncomfortable symptoms.

As for animals,the research done so far and reports I have read dogs I know they aren't human but many of us have those large breed ones have died in minutes. These reports were not even of the more potent specimens but from Poecilotheria,I wouldn't want to see a child tagged by these just imagine that small body having to fend off the venom. No tarantula anti venom exists,it is treated symptomatically.
 
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Whitelightning777

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L Klugi is a new world T, primary defense is urticating hairs not venom. They get very large. On my last ones molt, the fangs were truly impressive, both way larger then a wasp's stinger!!

She's probably even bigger now.

With that size, mechanical damage from the puncture itself becomes an issue when they're fully grown, which can be anywhere from 6"-9" as adults.

When handling molted skins, the hairs are still very much effective. Keep your hands away from your face just like it's a real spider. Regardless of temperament, never handle!!
 
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