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Flying feeders for arboreal tarantulas

Will

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Does anyone use any flying feeders for their arboreal T's? I was thinking that in their natural habitats they would probably catch moths and similar flying prey, and seeing as my young P metallica is very reluctant to eat (live) crickets I thought it might make a good alternative.
 

Enn49

Moderator
Staff member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
I'd only feed insects bred for livefood as any wild caught insects could have been in contact with pesticides.
 

jrh3

Active Member
3 Year Member
your right, there is a risk. but for my case over 5 years and no deaths from mantids being fed, cow flies and carpenter bees and other WC insects, i feel comfortable doing it. my area is in the country, but i could still happen. i just think WC is more nutrition, i could be wrong and still dont advise anyone to do it unless they are sure about pesticides. when i first started i would keep the fly for a day to see if any signs.

man, an adult mantis will go nuts over a carpenter bee.
 

kormath

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1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
your right, there is a risk. but for my case over 5 years and no deaths from mantids being fed, cow flies and carpenter bees and other WC insects, i feel comfortable doing it. my area is in the country, but i could still happen. i just think WC is more nutrition, i could be wrong and still dont advise anyone to do it unless they are sure about pesticides. when i first started i would keep the fly for a day to see if any signs.

man, an adult mantis will go nuts over a carpenter bee.
I'd argue they're less nutrion, You can gutload and overfeed CB feeders, plus control what they eat so they're more healthy for the T and other pets that eat them.
 

jrh3

Active Member
3 Year Member
I'd argue they're less nutrion, You can gutload and overfeed CB feeders, plus control what they eat so they're more healthy for the T and other pets that eat them.

you could be right. but most of the wc feeders i get compared to a CB, the wild caught is always bigger in size. seems their diet could play part of this.
 

MiaWolf42

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Does anyone use any flying feeders for their arboreal T's? I was thinking that in their natural habitats they would probably catch moths and similar flying prey, and seeing as my young P metallica is very reluctant to eat (live) crickets I thought it might make a good alternative.
Have you tried anything yet? I'm getting an A. versicolor and P. pulcher end of the month. I'm thinking of what to feed them.
 

kormath

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1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Have you tried anything yet? I'm getting an A. versicolor and P. pulcher end of the month. I'm thinking of what to feed them.
My versicolor goes nuts over crickets, she's only 3/4" or therebouts, so we feed her small crickets from the lps. she'll climb through her web tunnels to get to them. any other feeders we've tried (lateralis and dubia) have to find their way to her web tunnel to become food, or pass near her tunnel and she'll take them. I did find out that she will eat a roach bigger than her body size, but she leaves a portion of it she couldn't eat stuck in her web somewhere.

my A. sp Peru Purple has built her web tunnel just above the substrate, and has trip lines out near both entrances on the substrate, and will hunt any prey that triggers those. She's an aggressive eater compared to the versicolor, but they're both fun to watch at feeding time :)
 
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