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Enclosure warmth and humidity

Discussion in 'Tarantula Enclosures' started by Steve S., Apr 2, 2018.

  1. Steve S.

    Steve S. New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I have a small female Pink Toe living in a 10-gallon terrarium. I'm looking for advice on making it warmer and more humid. The best I can do is about 68-70 degrees and about 60 percent humidity. Would placing a warm-mist humidifier near the tank help? Right now I have a cool-mist humidifier that I already had been using in the house and put that near the tank. It helps somewhat with the humidity but not the heat. I also have a spray bottle that I use occasionally to mist the tank.

    A buddy of mine gave me a small heat pad that I stuck on the back glass after trying it underneath the tank but it doesn't seem to help much. I have about two inches of coco fiber substrate and was wondering if sticking a higher wattage pad to the tank bottom would work in conjunction with the coco fiber. Thanx for any help.

    Sent from my Commodore 64 running Windoze 95
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2018
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  2. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Hi Steve,
    All avicularia/caribena species need plenty of cross ventilation to survive not high humidity which can be a killer. A large water bowl is all that is needed.
    As long as the temperature in their room is warm enough for you to sit comfortably then it's warm enough for your Ts. A heat mat should not be necessary and definitely not under the terrarium. If you must use a heat pad only use it on the back and always use a thermostat to prevent overheating.
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  3. Arachnoclown

    Arachnoclown Well-Known Member

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    @Enn49 is right. Your temps are currently fine. Dry substrate and a large water dish and cross ventilation is all they need. I never spray or mist avics. Just over fill the water dish weekly. I never obsess over humidity...my T room is at 39%. A little thing about humidity and care sheets. People who write care sheets find the info where the T is from. This doesn't mean they can't survive somewhere else. Your T is probably captive breed and never lived in such environments . It's like saying people from Costa Rica can't survive living in Idaho. I've got lots of Avics and I wouldn't steer you wrong.
  4. Steve S.

    Steve S. New Member

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    Thanx for the tips. Good point about it probably being captive-bred. I do have a combo humidity gauge/thermometer to keep an eye on those levels. I just wanna try and be sure not to screw things up.
    :T:
    Sent from my Commodore 64 running Windoze 95
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  5. Mr. P

    Mr. P Active Member

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    The problem with high humidity in the enclosure is if you don't have good cross ventilation you will get rapid mold growth. You need a good balance between humidty and ventilation or the environment inside that enclosure will go downhill very quickly.
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  6. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    What you need to remember is that where they live it may be humid at ground level but up in the tree tops there is a breeze which keeps the humidity at bay.
  7. WolfSpider

    WolfSpider Well-Known Member

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    For Avics:
    The first thing to know: cross ventilation.
    The second thing to know: cross ventilation
    The third thru 10th thing to know: cross ventilation
  8. Steve S.

    Steve S. New Member

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    And the 11th thing to know is also cross ventilation? I have a 10-gallon tank where the only ventilation is the top (10x20?). Is that sufficient?
    :T:
    Sent from my Commodore 64 running Windoze 95
  9. Kurk1921

    Kurk1921 Member

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    Cross ventilation is not always necessary (for me at least). I like keeping my Ts in Exo Terras and those enclosures lack cross ventilation. As long as there is sufficient airflow it should be fine.
  10. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    They do have a limited amount as there are vents in the plastic strip just below the doors.
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  11. Kurk1921

    Kurk1921 Member

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    Regarding ventilation and humidity, @Enn49, I have seen you keep some Theraphosids in the subfamily Ornitochtoninae and Selenocosmiinae. I have heard and seen many people complain about their adult Asian arboreals being a fossorial and not revealing the arboreal behavior and lifestyle. Regarding this topic, with sufficient humidity (and of course enough airflow to prevent a stuffy enclosure), would they show some of these characteristics? I know and have seen many people keep their substrate rather dry but the lower levels moist, so is there a possibility that these adult Asian arboreals are just retaining their moisture requirements through the fossorial behavior? I'm just curious because I notice you keep some Asian arboreals and I have plans and reservations for some (and I also want to get some insight from you:)).
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  12. Kurk1921

    Kurk1921 Member

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    That is true.
  13. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Many arboreals will burrow as slings and then as they grow they move up into the top of their enclosures. I have 2 pokies and a Phormingochilus sp. Rufus that are doing this now, they'll all run to their burrows at times but spend most of their time in view up high. The exception is my adult P.metallica that has never burrowed who chose even as a sling to spend her time in the leaves at the top of her container. I've always kept them all dry except for overflowing the water bowl at times.
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  14. Kurk1921

    Kurk1921 Member

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    Interesting and thank you for the information. I have read somewhere that the smaller arboreal specimen tend to live lower and near the ground to minimize interactions with their larger counterparts.
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  15. Whitelightning777

    Whitelightning777 Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Remember, humid air is denser then dry air. Avics live in trees. They're a dry spider. A large water dish is however mandatory.

    They like it in the low 80s.
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  16. Whitelightning777

    Whitelightning777 Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Avics are dry spiders. They DO need a large water dish that is checked at least daily and kept full. Humidity probably shouldn't go over 60%.

    Strictly my opinion, but invest in a DIGITAL humidity gauge to make sure excessive humidity doesn't occur.

    I keep my Versicolor that way. If you catch your Avic on the ground, try gently guiding it into a water dish. If it's dehydrated, it'll do a face plant and you just saved it's life.

    C versicolor used to be classified as an avic but not anymore. I find mine likes it at 80 degrees. In general, if your temps start with a 6 or a 9, they aren't probably ideal.

    Of course, not all tarantulas require gauges. Some are practically bullet proof with husbandry and room temps are fine. Avics don't fall into that catagory especially slings.

    Exo Terra cages are cross ventilated, at least the tall ones are. There are vents at the bottom and a screen at the top. Air flows that way. The general quality of those cages is very good and they're a great choice for arboreal tarantulas.

    Charlotte's new enclosure..jpg
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