• Are you a Tarantula hobbyist? If so, we invite you to join our community! Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your pets and enclosures and chat with other Tarantula enthusiasts. Sign up today!

Comparable to A Geniculata

Cheeky Nhandus

New Member
Messages
8
Location
Runcorn, UK.
So I'm looking for a first T, don't mind some defensiveness I've did plenty of research and am more concerned about hardiness although I would like a large T. There seems to be a huge A Geniculata cult following and I get that with their hardiness and their beauty and size... BUT... I wanted to get something with the same qualities but not jumping on the A Geniculata bandwagon just yet, and not a fan of Lasiodora species. Nhandu is a contender, The Chromatus and Tripepii, I love the Carapoensis but it seems pretty small...

Are there any other large hardy T species you could mention. I got shot down on another board when I mentioned Sericopelma and I get why, people said I need more experience for their speed and defensiveness. Defensiveness isn't the issue for me but I get that if any that have any speed even near an old world like Psalmopeus species speed seems to approach, as they're very speedy for a new world... I get that... But I'm sure I can handle a terrestrial T picking up speed.

Do you guys agree I should adhere to a sort of ladder system and leave Sericopelma and Phormictopus species until later on? I was all geared up for them and excited but if someone experienced says wait then should I listen, or does it depend on the individual keeper.

Sorry for the essay. Thankyou
 

fcat

New Member
Messages
6
Location
Phoenix
I just want to chime in to say that every tarantula is going to have a unique personality. My pamphobeteus is my second nicest spider, and I had to employ a second paintbrush rehousing a genic sling tonight because he wouldn't let go of the first one. He already had a cricket in his mouth. He fought me for it multiple times. My brachypelma auratum threat poses me when I water, the Klaasi is the biggest spaz of them all and does several sprints around the enclosure when I feed. My g pulchra girl was slapping the substrate when I bought her and drove her home.

I don't handle my Ts and I pretty much treat them all like old worlds. I do get a little more relaxed during my rehouses with a few of my brachypelma admittedly, mine are all pretty predictable.

My last acquisition was a sericopelma generalum/generala who has been busy digging to China. She's nearing a premolt cycle but I gotta say, for being full grown it was probably my easiest rehouse yet. I was told she threat poses EVERYTHING. She was in a tiny deli cup, of course she was defensive. I've given her 3 different hides to choose from and she is currently working on connecting all three. She's happy and in her own little world. She's also nearing premolt, so I would expect her to be a little more slow moving and placid, like the one time it took my pamphobeteus (I recommend) a whole season to turn around. Joking, it was just very slow.

I am a firm believer if you meet their needs and give them somewhere to feel safe, you won't see these "defensive" behaviors. Except for my auratum, who is just threat posing because she can. It's been like watching a kitten learn to hiss. I pretend to act scared and let her be lol.

I have strict rules to never put any fingers or hands inside of my phormictopus enclosures. I wouldn't call them mean, just prey driven. I swear I'm trying to make them obese and it can't be done. They are often called the "poor man's pamphobeteus" because of the size and colors they can achieve. But you can get a pamphobeteus machala or mascara pretty cheap.

I drill all my enclosures so I can avoid opening the lid except to do big husbandry like clean out a water bowl. Otherwise I fill bowls with a syringe, have larger holes drilled to drop prey. It wouldn't really matter what I keep until it comes time for rehouses. There are lots of ways to keep both parties safe.

I only have one xenethis, guess I built the enclosure too well but I never see it. Literally. I would avoid on the basis of expensive.

I'll tell you who I would never want to meet in a dark alley are my psalmopoeus. One of my Darth mauls just walks around biting at things. Let me tell you, I went to town on their enclosures, giving them lots of places to hide, so I never have to see them. I always bang the enclosures to scare them before I have to do major husbandry, so they stay in their tunnels.

I didn't get on any trains that led me to my geniculatas, it was a species I was avoiding because of the hairs (not that I mind but I keep my spiders at his house so I thought it would be rude somehow). My boyfriend however just got into Ts and I told him he could get whatever he wants. He went for the staples, the genic, chromatus, LP, all species I was avoiding because of hairs actually lol.

This is getting long sorry. On the topic of hairs, I've done a couple hundred rehouses, water dish changes, feedings, retrievals of uneaten feeders and I can honestly say I've never been haired. I don't want to inadvertently discourage something that can be easily avoidable.
 

PanzoN88

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Messages
1,975
Location
Ohio
The ladder system as some call it is honestly what I would personally recommend to most newcomers to the hobby. A. geniculata is a great species to start with in my opinion however. I had a monstrous female that passed of old age a year ago. If you want big and supposedly defensive, I’d recommend the Phormictopus genus without hesitation. The Phormictopus genus is one of my favorites. The Phormictopus species I’ve raised were more shy and skittish rather than defensive and evil, they just have ridiculous appetites.

Even though you mentioned starting with more intermediate species, you shouldn’t overlook species such as G. pulchripes and C. cyaneopubescens. G. pulchripes have the size and beauty, as well as an appetite. C. cyaneopubescens has everything the G. pulchripes has, minus the large size, although there are some large specimens out there. I had a 6” female (she was my second tarantula). They are great for first time keepers who want to start with an easier to care for species that is also a bridge to more intermediate species.
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Messages
973
Location
Preston,UK
So I'm looking for a first T, don't mind some defensiveness I've did plenty of research and am more concerned about hardiness although I would like a large T. There seems to be a huge A Geniculata cult following and I get that with their hardiness and their beauty and size... BUT... I wanted to get something with the same qualities but not jumping on the A Geniculata bandwagon just yet, and not a fan of Lasiodora species. Nhandu is a contender, The Chromatus and Tripepii, I love the Carapoensis but it seems pretty small...

Are there any other large hardy T species you could mention. I got shot down on another board when I mentioned Sericopelma and I get why, people said I need more experience for their speed and defensiveness. Defensiveness isn't the issue for me but I get that if any that have any speed even near an old world like Psalmopeus species speed seems to approach, as they're very speedy for a new world... I get that... But I'm sure I can handle a terrestrial T picking up speed.

Do you guys agree I should adhere to a sort of ladder system and leave Sericopelma and Phormictopus species until later on? I was all geared up for them and excited but if someone experienced says wait then should I listen, or does it depend on the individual keeper.

Sorry for the essay. Thankyou
Hi
Have a look at Grammostola inheringi.
same threats in those as A geniculata. Good growth rates,voracious appetite and a little spicy too.
Regards Konstantin
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Messages
973
Location
Preston,UK
Also reading through your posts here and on the other forums it seems like you will have small collection so here are my recommendations for you All gorgeous, large and in same time different in appearance. I no particular order.
A geniculata
Grammostola inheringi
Phormictopus sp Dominican purple
Xenesthis sp blue
Pamphobeteus ultramarinus
Some of those are pricy and you most likely will not be able to find sexed females in UK (or will come with serious price tag)but they are worth it imo.
Another thing is to consider. Breeders will sometimes sell off old females past their best breeding prime so if you opt for AF you may not have them for long.Best option is to look for sexed juvenile females that way you will grow with your spider and you can be sure they have plenty of time left ahead of them.Even if you want your spider to be of substantial size most of those will grow from 2-3 inch to about 6+in an year or so.
Regards Konstantin
 

Enn49

Moderator
Staff member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Messages
10,958
Location
Malton, UK
My view has always been to get the tarantula that you really want as long as you've done your homework on their care and personalities.Taransulas of the same species can behave differently. I bagan in the hobby with an OBT (Pterinochilus murinus) and up to present day have owned 5 of them and never yet seen a threat pose.
I also have a Brachypelma hamorii that regularly gives me a threat pose.
 

m0lsx

Moderator
Staff member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Messages
2,111
Location
Norwich, UK
For a big easy to keep T that grows fast & has some personality, I would look at a Lasiodora parahybana. My biggest LP is well over 8.5 inches & is always happy to see the lid off & always pops up to say hello.

Phormictopus cancerides is another larger personality T. My old raggedy male, was a gentle old thing. My current female, is more feisty. But she goes no further than threat posturing.

Aphonopelma seemanni are very underrated within the hobby. They are a lovely looking T with some character, but very easy going & simplicity to keep.
 

Cheeky Nhandus

New Member
Messages
8
Location
Runcorn, UK.
Looks like A Geniculata
A Phormictopus Species either sp Purple or Cancerides
Grammostola Iheringi

I was warned that their may be longer periods of fasting in G Iheringi as it gets older and moults are less frequent and the moulting process takes longer but I know it's a fantastic eater

Not so big species I'd consider at some point are Nhandu Carapoensis and T Vagans.
 

Cheeky Nhandus

New Member
Messages
8
Location
Runcorn, UK.
My view has always been to get the tarantula that you really want as long as you've done your homework on their care and personalities.Taransulas of the same species can behave differently. I bagan in the hobby with an OBT (Pterinochilus murinus) and up to present day have owned 5 of them and never yet seen a threat pose.
I also have a Brachypelma hamorii that regularly gives me a threat pose.
I think with old worlds, I'm not a fan of the webbing like a lot of people are. I feel it conceals them and you don't wanna disturb webbing when doing maintenance etc, and I can deal with speed but it'd be easier if I knew where the T was to a degree so they have less chance of escape.although I'd make sure I put their enclosure in a big tray with high sides while.doinh anything like rehousing and have an array of catch-cups lol
 

Lawrence b

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Messages
714
Location
UK
Grammostola pulchripes can grow to a good size and generally calm.Also Nhandu tripepii is nice size but might be bit skittish .I have Sericopelma generalum mines a skittish and moves quite fast . But I agree with Enn49 if you do your research then what takes your fancy .
 

Cheeky Nhandus

New Member
Messages
8
Location
Runcorn, UK.
Grammostola pulchripes can grow to a good size and generally calm.Also Nhandu tripepii is nice size but might be bit skittish .I have Sericopelma generalum mines a skittish and moves quite fast . But I agree with Enn49 if you do your research then what takes your fancy .
I've just came across my post while searching for certain species. I now have an Acanthoscurria geniculata, A Cheloctonus jonesii Scorpion, A Deroplatys desiccata Mantis, I have C huahini and H himalayana. I am however gonna move those old worlds on and am looking at Sericopelma sp. Santa Catalina and Thrixopelma lagunas.
 
Top