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Classroom pet

kayshuhveehill

New Member
Hi all! I am considering purchasing a tarantula for my classroom "pet." Before I go any further, I want to make it clear that my students will not be handling the tarantula in any way, shape, or form! I want to have the spider in our classroom for educational purposes, not for entertainment purposes (though I do want them to get joy from watching the spider do it's spider thing).

The reason I am posting this thread is to ask for suggestions on which type of T to purchase. I have a T. vagans at home as a personal pet, and she is great, but she spends a LOT of time in her burrow (not saying this is a bad thing!). I would like a T that will spend more time out in the open so that my students can observe it often without having to search for it or wait for it to "surface." I know pink toes are a popular choice, but was hoping for other suggestions. I teach kindergarten and first grade, so a T with interesting colors would be a plus.

Thanks so much for reading all the way through - I look forward to everyone's suggestions!
 

ilovebrachys

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
I presume its an adult T you will be looking to get?
If so first choice for me would be a Grammostola pulchripes.. Beautiful large tarantula, good feeder and always out on display, the grammostola genus as a whole I can't recommend enough as they seem to have such character :)
Also brachypelma Hamorii... Gorgeous T and the one that everyone recognises again a great display T.. That's selection for you I hope it helps :)
 

kayshuhveehill

New Member
I presume its an adult T you will be looking to get?
If so first choice for me would be a Grammostola pulchripes.. Beautiful large tarantula, good feeder and always out on display, the grammostola genus as a whole I can't recommend enough as they seem to have such character :)
Also brachypelma Hamorii... Gorgeous T and the one that everyone recognises again a great display T.. That's selection for you I hope it helps :)
Yes, definitely an adult. I think that will be the best choice for my situation. I will be sure to check out your suggestions. Thanks so much!
 

PanzoN88

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
What a gorgeous girl! Sorry to hear she has passed. Thank you so much for your suggestion. I think this would be a beautiful T for my classroom!
Forgot to mention that they are relatively fast growers, so being that you teach kindergartners and 1st graders, they will likely get to see molts while they are still your students, since kids of that age range may lose interest after a while, watching the molting process may keep their interest. Seeing a tarantula change in coloration firsthand is exciting to an adult, so imagine how ecstatic 6-7 year olds are going to be.

I also agree with @ilovebrachys on the G. pulchripes, they are faster growing than many others in the Grammostola genus. I'll add a picture of mine after a fresh molt for more reference.

20191101_225628.jpg
 

kayshuhveehill

New Member
Forgot to mention that they are relatively fast growers, so being that you teach kindergartners and 1st graders, they will likely get to see molts while they are still your students, since kids of that age range may lose interest after a while, watching the molting process may keep their interest. Seeing a tarantula change in coloration firsthand is exciting to an adult, so imagine how ecstatic 6-7 year olds are going to be.

I also agree with @ilovebrachys on the G. pulchripes, they are faster growing than many others in the Grammostola genus. I'll add a picture of mine after a fresh molt for more reference.

View attachment 46134
That's good to know about their molting rate. I agree that it will certainly help to keep the kiddos' interest!
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
Tarantula Club Member
I know it is not a Tarantula, but my daughters high school had Giant Madagascan Hissing ****roaches. They are really simple (& cheap) to keep & can be handled. My daughter is now in her early 20's & she talks about the school roaches & loves to handle my Hissing Roaches.

A Giant Hissing Roach is about 3 inches long & makes a very impressive hissing sound.

Tarantula wise, as your profile tells me you from the US, how about a North American species like an Aphonopelma Johnnycashi or Aphonopelma chalcodes. The Johnniecashie was discovered close to Fulsom Prison & the males are black in colour, but the females are shades of desert browns.

Both my johnniecashie & chalcodes are normally out on show & my chalcodes I call Hohokum, as they live in the Sonoran Desert, among other places & like the Sonoran People it moves a lot of substrate.

Aphonopelma are really slow growing but an adult/sub adult is not hugely expensive.

This is Hohokam. They are one of the most responsive T's I own. If I take the lid off their enclosure & talk to them they really do move towards me.

c7.jpg
 

octanejunkie

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Why not get 2 or 3 of the same species tarantula of different sizes. A sling, juvie, adult, of a single species so they see the "evolution" of growth and get to experience the husbandry needs of the animal at different stages?
Sorry for suggesting more work for you lol
 

kayshuhveehill

New Member
I know it is not a Tarantula, but my daughters high school had Giant Madagascan Hissing ****roaches. They are really simple (& cheap) to keep & can be handled. My daughter is now in her early 20's & she talks about the school roaches & loves to handle my Hissing Roaches.

A Giant Hissing Roach is about 3 inches long & makes a very impressive hissing sound.

Tarantula wise, as your profile tells me you from the US, how about a North American species like an Aphonopelma Johnnycashi or Aphonopelma chalcodes. The Johnniecashie was discovered close to Fulsom Prison & the males are black in colour, but the females are shades of desert browns.

Both my johnniecashie & chalcodes are normally out on show & my chalcodes I call Hohokum, as they live in the Sonoran Desert, among other places & like the Sonoran People it moves a lot of substrate.

Aphonopelma are really slow growing but an adult/sub adult is not hugely expensive.

This is Hohokam. They are one of the most responsive T's I own. If I take the lid off their enclosure & talk to them they really do move towards me.

View attachment 46136
That's a beautiful T! I love the idea of a responsive T, as I think my students would really enjoy that type of interaction with them. And I love the name as well, what a neat story behind it!
 

kayshuhveehill

New Member
Why not get 2 or 3 of the same species tarantula of different sizes. A sling, juvie, adult, of a single species so they see the "evolution" of growth and get to experience the husbandry needs of the animal at different stages?
Sorry for suggesting more work for you lol
That's not a bad idea, though! It would be really neat to show them the "progression" of a live animal!
 
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