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Chaco golden knee

Enn49

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I've never been bitten by a T ...yet!! but I know they can have off days just like humans.
 

AntonyR

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She was quite docile last month and all of a sudden, she become really naughty. She is literally trying to get me. I can’t even recognise if she is close to pre-molting. Could this be an reason of her behaviour?
 

Enn49

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It could be premoult but it could be almost anything, even the weather. A few of mine have been more inclined to show me threat poses over the last few weeks
 

Arachnoclown

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Like @Enn49 said it could be premolt. I feel they lose some senses and even more vision when they are growing a new exoskeleton underneath. They feel more vulnerable and ready to defend themselves. Even on a good day they cant recognize you from someone else(poor vision). They can be territorial also....get her out and away from her enclosure and they sometimes become a different spider.
 

AntonyR

Member
Like @Enn49 said it could be premolt. I feel they lose some senses and even more vision when they are growing a new exoskeleton underneath. They feel more vulnerable and ready to defend themselves. Even on a good day they cant recognize you from someone else(poor vision). They can be territorial also....get her out and away from her enclosure and they sometimes become a different spider.
Will try !
 

Whitelightning777

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A paintbrush and a catch cup with the right lid are your friends. A 5" tarantula can do some damage if you get zapped.

Multiple sources I've seen have said that Grammostola genus members are quite moody.
 

nubka

New Member
I think you're probably right there. I know snakes secrete a fluid between old and new skins which is most evident in their eyes which go opaque hence the term a snake is "blue"
That is true about snakes. Our python was in blue stage when my husband decided to help him out by scooting him back inside his cave/hide. Poor Fifi could hardly see, and was very stressed out. He didn't like being "scooted" so he struck at my husband. Fifi is normally VERY docile (one of our granddaughters has been handling him since she was three years old,) and we have taken Fifi to many schools for reptile shows where he gets touched and held a lot with no problem.
 

MassExodus

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I'll say this. The only tarantula I've EVER owned that actively attacked anything that got close was a G pulchripes. It would charge and grip and climb and chase my hand across the screen top. This was not feeding instinct. My pulchra bit me from feeding instinct. No biggy. This pulchripes was evil. I sold it to a twelve year old.


I think he's dead.
 

nubka

New Member
I'll say this. The only tarantula I've EVER owned that actively attacked anything that got close was a G pulchripes. It would charge and grip and climb and chase my hand across the screen top. This was not feeding instinct. My pulchra bit me from feeding instinct. No biggy. This pulchripes was evil. I sold it to a twelve year old.


I think he's dead.
Our pulchripes has the feeding instinct of a rabid garbage disposal. She is always ready to eat, I really think that she would eat 2 - 3 times a day if we offered it to her (which we don't.) When she's not devouring helpless crickets, Inez enjoys charging at her water dish when I refill it with water - what a woman!
 

Avicularia Kael

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I'll say this. The only tarantula I've EVER owned that actively attacked anything that got close was a G pulchripes. It would charge and grip and climb and chase my hand across the screen top. This was not feeding instinct. My pulchra bit me from feeding instinct. No biggy. This pulchripes was evil. I sold it to a twelve year old.


I think he's dead.
Yep, definitely dead.
 

Whitelightning777

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Nah, that species is actually a pretty good first tarantula. You shouldn't be handling inverts anyway unless its an emergency.
 

Whitelightning777

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My B hamorii is actually ok with being handled & my C versicolor has walked on me before, but usually I'm much more hands off. In my opinion, Lasiodora species shouldn't be handled. Still, even with those who shouldn't be handled, a paint brush, catch cup with a proper lid and going slow are really all you need to do to avoid problems. Of course, with the faster ones or OWs, there should be some type of containment plan in case they bolt.
 

MassExodus

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The biggest T I've held regularly was a male Lp. He showed no defensiveness or inclination to bite or kick hair. He happily climbed up and down my arms. Its kind of a trip with the big ones, something I think every hobbiest should experience at least once. I got to a point where I just took him out by hand every time I paired him. It sucked when he died, I'd kkind of bonded with him. For my part, anyway.
 
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