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Can someone please identify this little baby.

Jess S

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It's a mature male of some furry brown description. Someone else can tell you a bit more!
 

Jess S

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Well I'm happy to be proved wrong, but those pedipalps on the 2nd photo look male to my eyes
 

kodakcollector

New Member
I know nothing! Rank beginner, finding these beauties in the wild. Have not decided to catch any. Hoping to see bigger ones after winter is over... based on the frequency of sightings, I think there might be quite a few here... i can try to photograph ruler next time.
 

Jess S

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Well I'm happy to be proved wrong, but those pedipalps on the 2nd photo look male to my eyes
Edit: but if it's only an inch then I'm probably wrong and should have spent more time looking at both photos. Males can mature at small sizes but an inch is stretching it lol
 

Jess S

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I know nothing! Rank beginner, finding these beauties in the wild. Have not decided to catch any. Hoping to see bigger ones after winter is over... based on the frequency of sightings, I think there might be quite a few here... i can try to photograph ruler next time.
You are so lucky, I'd love to see theraposids in the wild. Maybe one day.... I can dream! :)
 

Brachyfan

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I'm kinda digging around and think it is some (possibly undescribed) Aphonopelma species. Doesn't look like any described species to me. Since it is a small juvie it could be something else. Wouldn't know till it is bigger.
 
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Jess S

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My exact thoughts as well Jess.
Thank you, it's great to have another opinion here. :) To be honest, I just don't know. Those palps look mature (and if we discount size the spider has the appearance of a mm), but only 1" and I can't make out hooks (though hooks may be too small to see, or maybe a species that doesn't have them).

However, apparently there are dwarf Aphonopelma species that the males mature between 1-2". But I don't know enough about them and I don't even know what species we have here. Hopefully someone who does know the species will respond, but I think it'll be a difficult one to identify just from photos.
 

kodakcollector

New Member
Okay, so now I have to do a lot of research. Since I am not catching anyone so far. I need to figure out if I can find the same one and where he or she might live or hang out.

How much territory does it roam in. From reading posts, it seems they do not need much room in captivity, but, here on 5 acres, I wonder if they cover the whole place or a couple of meters or less. Are they hunting at night or during the day? Are they sunning for heat?

If the ones I have seen so far are juveniles, how long does it take to grow up?

I have not seen the same one twice. That is what I would like to change the most.
 

Jess S

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Most female tarantulas stay within or nearby their burrows. They hang at the entrance waiting for prey. If they are out actively hunting it tends to be at night. The only thing that would cause them to stray further is extreme hunger/thirst, you get the picture.
Males live much like females, up until the point they mature and are able to breed. Then they abandon their burrow and set off looking for a female.

Male Aphonopelma's roughly can live a decade give it take a few years. Females much, much longer. So they grow slowly. A juvenile would still be a few years old. Disclaimer: not sure if that is an Aphonopelma.

My best advice is why don't you contact your nearest university and find out from them how to contact someone specialising in arachnology? I'm sure they'd be interested in your local sightings and will be able to tell you a lot about your local species.
 

kodakcollector

New Member
Wow, thanks! The big problem is we are retiring to Mexico and I don't speak Spanish. We are not here permanently yet, so I have not spent as much time as i would like following these guys around.

Next time I find one, I will follow it for a couple hours. Or at least sit and watch it until it decides to leave. So far they are not really acknowledging me much at all.

I was with in a few inches taking pictures of each one. The one on the cistern did not move at all, the one on the patio just headed for the lavender. That one climbed up into the plant not down to the ground. The third in the grass by the cloths line just burrowed into a shallow hole in the grass. But, was gone when I checked in the morning.

All three were out in broad day light. All three have plenty of rock walls and piles to hide in. This is the most I have ever seen and will try to be more observant and will take better images and videos.
 

kodakcollector

New Member
I tried to post a mp4 of the red walking across the patio. But, apparently i can't. I am happy to send it to anyone interested or put it in drop box as its 44mb. This one on the patio has much more color than the one on the cistern. Also the one hiding next to the pvc pipe also had more red than the one on the cistern.

Last is the one on the cistern. At first I thought it was a wolf spider. But, they don't typically sit still very long.
 

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Jess S

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Aah, now I see that other shot of the one on the cistern, I can see the ends of the palps clearly in the new pic. Definitely not a mature male!
Certainly looks like a tarantula to me, rather than a wolf spider. However, I am no expert and species identification is not my thing. Reminds me a bit of the Bonnetina genus also, but not sure.
I love the one in the first photo, especially it's mirror patch (the round patch on its abdomen).
I imagine that they are living close to where you found them.

Are you from the states? If so, again a US university could help you track down a willing arachnologist who may let you send the photos. There are I believe a number of people who specialise in Mexican species in the States.

I look forward to seeing more of your photos when you get the opportunity. I do hope you'll continue to post them here.
 
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