• Are you a Tarantula hobbyist? If so, we invite you to join our community! Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your pets and enclosures and chat with other Tarantula enthusiasts. Sign up today!

Anyone been bit by a lasiodora Parahybana?

Goshawk

New Member
Messages
19
Location
United Kingdom
I was wondering if anyone has been bitten by a lasiodora parahybana?
I have one and so far have not been bitten but I do want to know what the effects can be just in case!

It’s a very docile T and doesn’t get defensive over anything I’m just looking to see what would happen if I had to prepare for the worst :T: :)
 

Arachnoclown

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Messages
6,293
Location
The Oregon rain forest
I've hard my fingernail tagged by a fang but other then that they usually run of flick nasty hairs. They may be docile one day but when they hit premolt you'll get bit. They're really defensive when in premolt, along with most other Ts. When in premolt they lose more senses along with even more vision. They will not hesitate to strike first at this point. I've got a few large LPs myself. I'm more worried about the damage their fangs would produce then their venom. :)
 

MassExodus

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Messages
5,568
Location
Outside San Antonio, TX
Had a big male that was a puppydog. Handled him all the time. If he would have bitten me, mechanical damage was definitley a possibility, and more of a worry then venom. Ive been bitten once by a G pulchra. Its weird, different then a bee or scorpion sting, but not bad.
 

spodermin

Well-Known Member
Messages
290
Location
Unknown Island
Yeah fangs > venom for an L.P., and as stated the hairs are the biggest threat.

I've heard as L.P. mature though, they get more defensive and more likely to bite. However, my subadult is as or more friendly than my juvy.

Just look at the fangs though!
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20190418_004446.jpg
    IMG_20190418_004446.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 291

Tnoob

Well-Known Member
Messages
881
Location
Utah
Yeah fangs > venom for an L.P., and as stated the hairs are the biggest threat.

I've heard as L.P. mature though, they get more defensive and more likely to bite. However, my subadult is as or more friendly than my juvy.

Just look at the fangs though!
How tall are you? 5'8" 5'9"?
 

Tnoob

Well-Known Member
Messages
881
Location
Utah
Well, actually I was judging your height by the size of your thumb, there are a few calculations you can do to get that kind of information.
 

lasiodora-parahybana1980

Active Member
3 Year Member
Messages
51
Location
Arizona
I was wondering if anyone has been bitten by a lasiodora parahybana?
I have one and so far have not been bitten but I do want to know what the effects can be just in case!

It’s a very docile T and doesn’t get defensive over anything I’m just looking to see what would happen if I had to prepare for the worst :T: :)
Interesting question, have been wondering the same thing. I've got a sub adult about 5''. Whenever the enclosure is opened, the spider heads straight for the burrow. I'm in agreement with others on being bitten. I am not all that worried about the venom, but those fangs would probably not be fun.
 
Last edited:

Whitelightning777

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Messages
2,566
Location
Baltimore MD
I have a L klugi & it's the feeding responses that'll get them to attack tongs, waterdish etc. Only my T stirmi (who really jacked me up) has larger fangs.

A catch cup, proper fitting lid & a paintbrush are your best friends, doubly so if you are doing old worlds

The best advice I can give is don't try to find out.

The urticating hairs are also capable of making you miserable. Protect your eyes!!
 
Last edited:

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Messages
1,198
Location
South Wales
Question is there a tarantula you should be worried about there vemon??

I wouldn't want to be bit by any of them! As a rule of thumb though, Old World tarantulas' venom tend to be stronger than New Worlds.

The species that are generally regarded as being the most medically significant are:

Stromatopelma calceatum
Heteroscoda maculata
Any species from the genus Poecilotheria.

However, not every species has had its venom studied in depth, plus everyone can react differently to a bite, i.e. allergic reactions. The intensity of a bite can be affected by factors such as the size of the spider, whether it delivered a full dose or not, etc. That's why it is best to avoid being bitten!
 

Whitelightning777

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Messages
2,566
Location
Baltimore MD
Generally old world ones are considered worse then new world ones.

Psalmos, such as P irminia are thought to be somewhere in between. These are new world Ts, but lack urticating hairs.

Mechanical damage from fangs is also a factor and directly related to size.

Another important factor is attitude. A defensive T is that much more likely to bite. Some Ts have a strong feeling response but they are ignoring you & focusing on that which they vaguely suspect of being food, basically anything that stands about 1% chance of being edible. That's not the same thing.
 

Latest posts

Top