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pink toe acting weird?

Discussion in 'Avicularia' started by KodyBailey, Apr 15, 2013.

  1. TAYLOR

    TAYLOR New Member

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    So i have had my pink toe for a little over a week now. The first couple of nights she was out climbing on walls and stuff. But now whenever i wake up in the middle of the night i never see her. And she has this fake tree in her tank that has a cave thing she can go up inside of. & ever since she found out she can hide in there. She doesn't leave. I never see her unless I tip the tree over and look under there. Is this normal? She has eaten the two crickets i put in there. She just never leaves. No webs or anything. The pet store guy said when/it she leave the tree to take it out and put a log in there or she will never leave it. But if she feels safe in there I dont want to take that from her. But at the same time I can never get to her cause she always so far in the tree.
  2. kormath

    kormath Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    all spiders need a place to hide to feel safe. Give it time and when it's comfy in it's new home you've made it, it may come out. Disturbing it by picking up the log to look at it is going to increase the time it takes to settle in though. Give it time to settle and adjust.
  3. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Firstly, welcome to the hobby. Secondly it will hake time for any tarantula to settle into a new home so you need to leave it alone for a time. Very few tarantula keepers handle their Ts as it stresses them and a fall can be fatal, if you feel the need to handle yours always do it over a soft surface and low down so if it jumps or falls off you it hasn't far to fall but please give it time to settle, maybe a month. She'll start webbing her home once she's settled in and then she'll start feeding too.
    VanessaS likes this.
  4. VanessaS

    VanessaS Well-Known Member

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    Please don't follow that advice. They hide because that is their nature and denying them that only stresses them out. Let them get comfortable and you might see them more often. However, the avics are often a reclusive bunch and are not the best species to have if you want them to be out and visible all the time. A Grammostola or Bracypelma is more apt to behave like that when they grow up... avics are less likely to do so.
    kormath likes this.
  5. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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    Hello everyone I'm hoping you can answer my dilemma... I have had a avic for about a year... it is a very odd spider... it molted at the beginning of the summer like may to June for complete cycle... without knowing better in July I tore down its web capsule when cleaning the cage... my spider was obviously mad about that and grounded itself for about a month... eventually going back to its perch and rewebbing again and I thought all was back to normal... my issue is my spider has not eaten since his molt... its Christmas Eve and the last time my spider ate a cricket was early may... it looks healthy and vibrant it mostly sits in its perch and does nothing but occasionally will climb down on the ground for a day or two and then go back up... I put in 3 crickets a week and I leave them until they die... I've tried other bugs I catch I've tried getting the bugs up close to the spider I've tried just leaving them alone and feeding the bugs to keep em alive long enough for my spider to eat them and I got nothing every 3 I put in die... I have good room temps so no direct cage heating and a large water bowl for humidity that I occasionally dump over to water the 1 live plant inside his cage I stopped handling it when I first got it because of the stress... I try to leave it be so it's a happy tarantula but cannot get it to eat... help
  6. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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  7. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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  8. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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  9. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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  10. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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  11. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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  12. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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  13. kormath

    kormath Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    no cross ventilation. cross ventilation is a must for avics. they don't do well when the air becomes stagnant in the enclosure. cross vents allow a continual air circulation. yours is in a stress pose like mine was before i read about the need for cross ventilation and asked for enclosure help here.

    Few ideas off hand, put a fan nearby to blow over the top of the enclosure, not in it, that may create enough air movement to help the little guy out inside the enclosure. If your handy with tools, or have someone around that is, you could try drilling some small vent holes in opposite sides to increase the air flow, remove the T first of course.

    Last resort you can buy acrylic enclosure similar size to that and drill holes in the sides easily. They may not look as fancy but may help your T to thrive.
  14. Stevet

    Stevet New Member

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    Don't drill the holes guys !! Use a fine point soldering iron


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  15. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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    I have plenty of ventilation it's enclosure is full screen toped and has the cross vent bar along the front and there's plenty of air movement in the room as he sits in our bedroom and we are always in and out... it's now a few days from April and it still has not eaten... I purchased as very mild temp pad and tapped it to one side to attempt to warm it up a bit but just the glass ON the spot the pad is on is alil warmer it didn't heat the enclosure a bit ... when I first installed it my spider seemed to hug that side but now he cares less... he's been grounded for about 2 months now but still active and moving locations on the ground... still not aten for a almost a year now... I don't even know how long they can survive without food
  16. Coronanick

    Coronanick New Member

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