1. Are you a Tarantula hobbyist? If so, we invite you to join our community! Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your pets and enclosures and chat with other Tarantula enthusiasts. Sign up today!

Buying 2nd instar scorplings and slings.

Discussion in 'General Tarantula Discussion' started by Telson, Jun 29, 2016.

  1. Telson

    Telson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2016
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    280
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I just wanted to share my experiences purchasing 2nd instars. I've only bought one sling at that size, and it died one day after arrival. Ive purchased several scorplings at that size, all recently, and I've lost 4 out of maybe 15 of them, to unknown causes. I had seen a few veteran breeders suggest to people that they shouldn't buy them that small, and I'm finding out rather quickly that they were right. Of course when theres lots of babies in a brood, or sac, some just aren't meant to make it, but most of the sickly ones will perish before 3i, and scorps and tarantulas both seem to become a little tougher once they reach that mark, and less prone to die suddenly for unknown reasons. Just a little advice: 3i is the magic number. Don't waste your money. Breeders know all this, but some will sell them to you anyway. Beware people trying to unload 2i babies as fast as they can.
  2. timc

    timc Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2015
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    347
    Trophy Points:
    63
    One of the benefits of not being able to find food for slings that small is that I don't waste my money on them. I did once on a teeny tiny LP that was like a speck of dust that would move around. For the two weeks (maybe? This was a number of years ago and I really don't remember) I had the little guy it wouldn't eat any chopped up food, wouldn't drink, didn't molt, and was dead one morning when I woke up. Thanks for bringing attention to this because I'm sure you and I aren't the only ones who have had bad experiences like these. It does stink when it happens but those sellers are out to make money, so it's on the buyer to be aware of what is and what isn't worth spending their money on.
    Kymura and Telson like this.
  3. kormath

    kormath Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2015
    Messages:
    3,271
    Media:
    30
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    3,623
    Trophy Points:
    113
    agreed, although if you do happen to get a tiny sling like this (here we go again :D) get the Little Kenyan roaches. nymphs are about 2mm and full size is about 1/2", great alternative to fruit flies. Only problem is they will burrow, but not as bad or quick as the dubia roaches and such.

    My little bitty L. itabunae i'd have to guess is 2i when purchased, maybe 3i, i'm not sure what sizes they are at that stage and she was just a hair over 3/8" dls. She ate a little kenyan the first day, then burried herself away. Since then the little kenyans have molted and grown and aren't small enough, So i'm saving those to let them breed and hopefully start a colony. Wednesday i squished the head of a lat and put it by her burrow (she had the burrow entrance opened tuesday afternoon when i looked) and by the time i was done feed all the others the roach was nowhere in site. I removed the waterdish to see if it had squirmed under it in it's death spasms but nope, i'm positive she snuck out and drug the carcass into her burrow :)
    Telson likes this.
  4. Nicolas C

    Nicolas C Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2015
    Messages:
    594
    Likes Received:
    969
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Really hard to say because it depends on a lot of factors. But a typical B boehmei egg sack has about 600 to 1000 babies inside.
    Telson likes this.
  5. Kymura

    Kymura Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2015
    Messages:
    3,217
    Media:
    92
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3,726
    Trophy Points:
    113
    -Blinks-.....and yet they still demand a pretty penny when you try to buy them...hard to breed?
  6. kormath

    kormath Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2015
    Messages:
    3,271
    Media:
    30
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    3,623
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I didn't think they were that expensive, about the same as my smithi and others. B. albo is the lowest cost next to my G. rosea and B. vagans. I paid 15 each for my 2 albo's, $10 for my rosea, $ 9.99 for the vagans, $30 for my smithi, and $30 for the boehmei.
  7. Kymura

    Kymura Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2015
    Messages:
    3,217
    Media:
    92
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3,726
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Think if I had a thousand healthy eating slings I'd be pretty greedy to ask thirty bucks for them.
    Telson likes this.
  8. Telson

    Telson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2016
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    280
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Have to agree with you there.
    Kymura likes this.
  9. Vince1208

    Vince1208 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You should just give 2nd instar sling water untill it molts and then you can start feeding it
    MassExodus likes this.
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page